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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently have 150 watts of MH in my 60P planted with HC and Bylxa. I noticed that the some of the rummy nose tetras loose their red noses whenever the lights come on. Once the lights cut-off, they all get their color back. I suspect they do not care for the high light :(. OTOH the rams and otos do not seem to be bothered by it at all.

I am guessing that out in the wild, these fish normally live in subdued lighting. Blasting them with a second sun is good for the plants but not so happy for the fish. Although some might be more tolerant of high light than others. In my previous setup, the cardinal tetras were not at all bothered by the bright light. In George Farmer's recent masterpiece http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/aquascaping/53296-60cm-english-summer.html, the black neons look great under high light too.

Anyone have recommendations on small schooling fish that are "light tolerant".
 

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Hmmm. I use MH lighting too and my rummies don't seem to mind at all. They're out swimming in the open with perfectly good coloration. Maybe yours don't have enough cover or other dither fish to feel secure.

Apart from bottom dwellers like corries and plecos, I haven't seen too many fish that are really annoyed by bright light. Even with our "high-tech" lights, most of our tanks are pretty dim compared to full sunlight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hmmm. I use MH lighting too and my rummies don't seem to mind at all. They're out swimming in the open with perfectly good coloration. Maybe yours don't have enough cover or other dither fish to feel secure.

Apart from bottom dwellers like corries and plecos, I haven't seen too many fish that are really annoyed by bright light. Even with our "high-tech" lights, most of our tanks are pretty dim compared to full sunlight.
The former might be one possibility - the Iwagumi setup does not leave any room for hiding. I don't think they are afraid of the ram :axe:, esp when it comes to feeding time. Those suckers will literally snatch food out of its mouth!

What are "dither" fish?
 

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No. "Dither fish" are those species which aren't afraid to swim actively in the open. They are sometimes used to give shy fish the impression that "the coast is clear". In nature small, vulnerable species take clues from the activity of larger fish. Danios, rainbows, and other active species can fill this role.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No. "Dither fish" are those species which aren't afraid to swim actively in the open. They are sometimes used to give shy fish the impression that "the coast is clear". In nature small, vulnerable species take clues from the activity of larger fish. Danios, rainbows, and other active species can fill this role.
Interesting Bryce! So being in a small school does not necessarily fulfill this role. I noticed that the rummys sometimes follow the ram around the tank - as if to let the big guy ride shotgun. I have a school of 10, do you think having a bigger school (within the constraints of the tank) might help?
 

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10 should be enough. I find that adding more sometimes causes them to not school as tightly. If you add too many it starts to look like a bunch of fish crammed into a tank.

Rams are by nature very shy and they certainly don't like the light. You might try adding a small school of rasboras (harlequins are nice), a few rainbows, or something a bit more active.
 
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