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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now that I am getting my 90 gallon started up the planted tank bug is bitting again. I have an old 2.5 gallon bowfront tank that I used to have set up. I'm thinking about setting it up as a little planted desktop tank. With ligting coming as far as it has come since I last had it set up, I'm thinking about getting a new light fixture for it. I was looking at either the Finnex clip on Stingray or the Finnex clip on Planted+. I'm not looking to mess with a co2 setup on this tank, trying to keep it simple, would either light be better suited for this setup?

Thank you.
 

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I have both Finnex fixtures, although on much larger tanks. I also have a 2.5 gal bowfront, but never used a Finnex fixture on it. But if I did, I would get the Stingray.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What size tanks are you running them on? What fixtures have you used on your 2.5 gallon bow? Is there any reason you wouldn't have used one on yours or why I shouldn't use one on mine?

Thank you.
 

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First, all my tanks are Walstad tanks with no CO2 and low to moderate lighting. The Planted + is on a 75, a deep tank that needs more light. The Stingrays are on a 40B and a 20L, both shallow tanks. The 40B needs two Stingrays because they have a rather narrow light spread.

For the 2.5 bowfront, I have used:

1. No artificial light when placed neaqr a window.
2. An old clip-on fluorescent fixture which was not very effective and eventually died.
3. A desk lamp with a spiral compact fluorescent 6500K 13W 800 lumen. This worked best.

I haven't bought a Finnex for it because the desk lamp/SCF works well. When the SCF gives up, I'll buy a suitable LED replacement "bulb". I use these on 20T and 15 already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for the reply. I guess the question I'm having is, is there any reason on paper that light wouldn't work for me/my tank? Is it going to be "too much" for the tank? These new fangled LED lights are all new to me, so I'm learning something new (sorry for all the questions).
 

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No reason "on paper".

Is the height of the fixture above the water adjustable? One of the easiest fixes for too much light is to raise the fixture. You can also use floating plants or window screen to shade the tank for different light levels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The specific fixture in question would clip on to the edge of the aquarium and has an arm that comes up and over, that is attached to the light. It looks like a flex arm, so I'd assume it has a slight amount of adjustment in height, but I'd assume it's pretty minimal. I wouldn't be opposed to adding window screen or floating plants to the tank. I'm completely new to LED lighting, so I don't know how it all translates over, just trying to make sure I don't get something completely overboard for the tank.
 

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Here is a helpful review of the Stingray clip-on:
Finnex Stingray Cliplight LED Review - Spec-Tanks
It doesn't give a PAR rating, but if the clip-on is similar to the larger versions I have on my tanks, it should give about 30 PAR at the substrate. This is plenty for a low light no CO2 tank. The review also mentions that Finnex makes a Planted+ clip-on, a much higher PAR fixture.

The review convinced me that if I move my 2.5 bowfront out of the window where it is now, I'll probably buy one.
 
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