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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems that for the best answers I always return here 馃榿 so here comes another question..

I have Lilaeopsis growing in my 10g walstad tank from the beginning. Growth has been slow, but steady. Resently I removed a driftwood and planted some more Lilaeopsis in its place.

Now all the new Lilaeopsis are either melting away, literally rotting or roots are coming off from the substrate. The original ones are steady and looking good.

You can see in the photo, one black spot in the background where the plant has melted completely.

Why is that?
Should I remove the melting ones or just leave them to melt and release nutrients? Any harm in that?
73594
73595
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There might be some anaerobic soils under the driftwood causing the melt. Poke area to reduce the anaerobic soil.
Okay, this crossed my mind, but I poked and disturbed the substrate when I planted the new Lilaeopsis. Maybe I didn't do it properly or wide area enough.

Thank you again 馃憤馃徎
 

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I would suggest that it may be your water chemistry which is
probably a function of your substrate as much as your water supply. I suspect that Walstad natural tanks with few water changes have a water chemistry as much determined by their substrate as their water supply. Water chemistry and the effect of substrates are part of my ongoing plant experiments. I have hard water and lilaeopsis grows like a weed (not in soil tanks - I haven't got to that point with lilaeopsis). My water is Ph8/KH7/GH10. I used to live in a big city with soft water Ph7.4 and I could never grow lilaeopsis properly, though it is true that I didn't know much about fertilisers back then, which may have been the problem? I find Val and lilaeopsis love hard high PH water but I may be mistaken.

[ EDIT: I have to say though that your lilaeopsis looks pretty good to me. Can't see the problem? A bit of melt is to be expected in a healthy bunch.]

The other reason I suspect this is the case is both are native species in Australia where the waters are hard and high PH, at least the waters near me. My local natural waters are Ph8+ and hardness off the scale.

However I must say that my lilaeopsis my original batch had a sever melt down, all the leaves die and it then grows back healthy and stays that way - at least that is my experience. My Brisbanica is still in its melt down stage and regrowing after 7 months! but I suspect its because the various experimental tanks I put it in which it doesn't like as much - its had a hard life - but its still alive!. If I added it to the tank with my Brasiliensis I supect it would do very well, but I keep the two apart. Right now some of my Brisbanica and Brasiliensis (in separate tanks) is outdoors in winter with water temperatures down to 6 deg C overnight until noon as an experiment to see if it will survive an Australian winter - so far it is alive but looking alot paler than it did in summer. Amazingly some of the daphnia have survived these temperature but I have noticed I don't see them moving around much until the afternoon when the water temperature gets to about 15-24 deg C. We have cold winters but a hot sun, and my outdoor tanks are in a greenhouse like shed.

Every soil I have added lilaeopsis to so far has been a disaster but I am still trying new soils and muds with it. Maybe my success is that I use ADA Amazonia V2? Not sure.

Lilaeopsis Brisbanica (I honestly can't tell the difference between this one and Brasiliensis as I believe I have both) also seem to tolerate brackish waters which are certainly not soft waters. It lives, or once lived, in the Brisbane river close to the coast where the river meets the ocean. As this is the city of Brisbane I am skeptical it may still be in that location, but it might be? I bought it from a nursery here as a 'native' (sold as Brisbanica) but I suspect it may just be the commonly sold Brasilensis as it looks identical to me?

---
OFF TOPIC: on the subject of Australian winters (at least South of Brisbane and North of Tasmania, Sydney/Perth locations) I once knew a guy in the early 1990's who worked in an aquarium store which has long since disappeared in Sydney sadly. The Coral Sea Aquarium in Randwick near the Ritz Cinema - hardly anyone remembers it now. It is now a cafe. I think this was the first aquarium store I ever walked into and I will never forget it. Most fish were about a dollar - the living ones that is.

(it was really old school - I met some Aquarium legends in Sydney in the 1990's, when I began my aquarium adventures, people who are still talked about here though they are long since dead or retired, a certain German gent in Bondi Junction comes to mind (Horst if I recall, Bronte Road Bondi Junction - a Sydney aquarium store legend). He was like something out of the 1800's and his entire store was wood and glass, but not cheap wood - Victorian England era type wood, something your great grandfather would have owned. His shop front display tank looked like something from the 1800's. Horst and the old 'Badham Library' (Natural History/Botany library, Sydney University built in the 1920's I believe but maybe earlier - God knows what it is now? where I would find out about aquaria and first read Baensch), and Sydney Centennial Park will forever be my 1990's.

The local history of this little shop (aquatic paradise!) can be found at if anyone is interested.

Centennial Park which as its name suggests was named to celebrate Australian Federation (January 1st 1901), and was begun in 1887, from what was originally a swamp wasteland called Lachland Swamps, is the home of alot of one-legged ducks. If you have ever seen a one-legged duck and wondered how this could be, you have never seen the giant electric eels (some are maybe 6 foot long?) and enormous devonian size chinese carp that live there. To swim in that water would be to invite death. Only dogs do so. The carp are enormous but I suspect the eels are the real predators. The chinese carp are introduced but where the eels came from I have no idea. I suppose for a duck it is a readily made compromise. They trade a leg for their life. I have noticed that where I live now, the outback, all the ducks have two legs! I feel safer swimming around here in local waterholes knowing this.

Anyway the guy I knew told me that he was breeding South American Pleco catfish (the big ones) in outdoor ponds in Sydney. To this day I think he must have been talking about Sydney in Summer, but I will never now know. Would love to ask him. My dream has always been to keep corys outdoor in summer. One day I may do this.

Incidentally I think the reason that alot of aquarists don't get 'Baensch' now, they consider it outdated, which no doubt it is, is because it is in many ways for us nostalgia. Though I have to say that its pages are mostly timeless - there are truths and observations in Baensch that will forever be valued.
 

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@Garuda2520, it may interest you to know that your lilaeopsis is actually most likely Brasiliensis not the NZ species which is markedly different plant not in the aquarium hobby yet it seems.

References

Personally I prefer Brasiliensis in terms of its aesthetics. Brisbanica is a hard one to identify it seems. From what I have read the fruit/nuts are required for an ID from the Brasil version.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@Garuda2520, it may interest you to know that your lilaeopsis is actually most likely Brasilensis not the NZ species which is markedly different plant not in the aquarium hobby yet it seems.

References

Personally I prefer Brasiliensis in terms of its aesthetics. Brisbanica is a hard one to identify it seems. From what I have read the flowers and nuts are required for an ID from the Brasil version.
Thank you for the information. It was sold to me as NZ variation, so I didn't question that :)
 
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