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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have any experience with piping CO2 over a long distance from the cylinder to the aquarium and reactor? I searched the archives, but didn't have any success. I think I recall reading in another forum that copper tubing can be used to carry CO2 over a long distance.

I am wondering if I could use copper tubing or something else to pipe the CO2 over a distance of approximately 75 feet.

If copper tubing can be used, would it require welding the tubing to a fitting to which the needle valve could be attached?

Does anyone have any ideas?
 

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I think it was Rex Grigg who suggested copper piping in that other forum. I remember reading it.

75' is a long distance. Given the distance, the possible need to hide the pipe, the cost of the pipe, the bending of it around its route to the new location, and any tapping or joining needed, I would go for another #5 cylinder and regulator - unless you're a plumber. But if you are a plumber, you would be able to afford a new system (since plumbers, at least in NYC, have fee scales almost as high as bankers).

Andrew Cribb
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply, Andrew. No, I'm not a plumber, although your oh-so-true comment regarding their fees is why I often find myself spending more time wrestling with plumbing projects around the house then I like.

I'm going to research the possibilities of obtaining a 75-100ft roll of copper tubing from a wholesaler just out of curiosity. As for hiding the tubing, perhaps it could be run through the attic.

Does anyone else have any suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Would this work? http://www.wellspent.org/Product?p=68847
I would need two rolls. Now I need to know how to attach the copper tubing to the regulator and subsequent needle valves. Given I have a 20# cylinder, I think this might be more economical than purchasing an additional 5# cylinder, regulator, and needle valve.

Rexx, I haven't seen you post here in a while. Can you share any insight regarding attaching the copper tubing to the regulator? What size tubing would you suggest? What fittings would be needed to attach the needle valve to the copper tubing?[/url]
 

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The needle valve should be threaded to accept a standard sized brass fitting. All you need to do is get a mating part that has an appropriately sized compresion fitting on the other end that will accept the 1/8" copper tubing.
 

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Rob,

I'm not really convinced that CO2 is indeed lost to a great extent when using regular clear air tubing. Still 75' is quite far. I've used air tubing for a distance of about 25' and it worked ok.

Instead of copper piping why don't you try the CO2 proof black tubing? It has quite thick wall and it's pretty rigid.

--Nikolay
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Niko, can you suggest any sources for purchasing a large quantity of the CO2-resistant tubing?

Thank you all for your replies.
 

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I was able to find a large selection of brass fittings at a local Hydraulic SUpply store. They had everything I have ever needed in brass fittings.

Also, I have split off my 20# tank and ran 20' using Nylon tubing (also from the hydraulics supply store). I don't really know if it is leaking CO2 or not but here is a handy little chart comparing the permiability of different materials - lower the number the better. Nylon is 20, seems like one of the lower numbers. If you could I think I would use copper for such a distance.

I think the CO2 Proof tubing is Polyethelyne, not 100% sure though.

http://www.coleparmer.com/techinfo/techinfo.asp?htmlfile=SelectingTubing.htm
 

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I had the discussion with Rex about using copper on another forum. It is a good idea if you want to go that route. I didn't want to go that route.

I use the CO2 tubing that bars use to run their draft beer systems. It is extra thick walled and supposed to be resistant to leakage. The 20# tank that has been feeding three 30 gallon aquariums at a rate of 40 bpm, each, for a year now shows minimal (read 'I haven't seen any') loss of pressure in the tank. I think it is working. I bought the tubing from a 'homebrewing' website, along with some fittings and a CO2 regulator. I don't remember the particular site but a search for 'home brew' on Google should find many places if you can't pick a tubing from US Plastics.
 

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What I did was put the needle valve for the far away tank right next to the co2 regulator. Then I ran the co2 line all the way across to the tank that it is to inject CO2 into. That way there is only minmal pressure in the long hose (to avoid leaks).

Whiskey
 
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