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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everybody, English is not my native language so sorry for
any possible mistakes.

Get the 2L PET bottle and put there 6 full spoons of sugar, 3 full spoons of
starch and a full spoon of baking soda (NaHCO3). Add approx 2 glass of water
and put it into a pot with the water level same as in the bottle. It takes about
15-20 minutes of boiling. Every 5 minutes shake the bottle to mix the liquid.
When the liquid becomes a sort of jelly cool down the bottle and add a tea
spoon of yeast dissolved in the 20 grams of water.

Should last for 1-2 month.
 

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I have seen the idea of a gelled sugar as a way to extend the life of DIY CO2. Wouldn't this reduce the amount of CO2 per day, though?
 

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Can yeast use the starch? Or only the sugar?

If you start with same amount of sugar and same amount of yeast.
Then the total amount of CO2 ought to be the same. The only difference is the time span.

A liquid reactor quits after about 3 weeks, but the gelled system continues producing for twice as long, but both stop at the same point (yeast is poisoned, or sugar is used up) then the amount of CO2 produced is the same, but is spread over twice as long in the gelled system. Therefore the CO2 produced per day is less in the gelled system.
 

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My recipe:
2 liter soda bottle
.5 liters sugar
1.5 liters water
1/4 teaspoon yeast (1.25 ml is the metric volume equivalent)

I get pretty close to 3 weeks out of this, with the best production in the first 2 weeks. A few are still bubbling a bit at the end of 3 weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I tried quite similar recipe but find the "jelly" one to be more lasting. Couldn't see the
difference in amount of CO2 emission. It just works well. Can not say if anything
was wrong with the jelly. The starch makes sugar to be tied with it moreover starch is
carbohydrate feed for yeast.

I presume the starch is made from potato and is a good nutritive medium yeast inoculation.
 

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I know different starches are available, but I am not sure which ones would set up really well.
I use cornstarch to thicken sauces, and I think that becomes gel-like when it cools. Probably more than the amount I use in sauces would really set up nicely.

OK, so the starch will eventually break down to become available to the yeast as a food supply, supplementing the sugar as it is used up.
 

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Does the stuff finally break down to become liquid enough that it can be removed from the container when it is time to replace the mix?
 

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Can yeast use the starch? Or only the sugar?
Hi Diana,
Peskar is correct as far as the utilization of starch. DIYCO(2)
recipes generally are 2/3 of the recipe for sourdough starter sponge.
Sugar gives the yeast sponge a quick start as it does in humans. The
addition of starch, i.e. flour or potato starch gives the yeast a longer
lasting or slower burning form of nutrition, just as it does in humans.

You can make use of your DIYCO(2) as sourdough
starter if you feed it flour plus replacing water for every cup you
remove for bread baking. Justifies the cost of the ingredients
and gives you some really great tasting bread!
You really never have to throw away the DIYCO(2) and start over
if you make use of what you are brewing up.

Resource link: Sourdough sponge starter
The web site is formatted rather strangely for the web; however if you
pick your way around the call out boxes, you will get very good, very thorough
information on both starter and sponge as well as baking with your
DIYCO(2).
Merry Christmas, Happy New Year!
 

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I don't know if anyone is still following this thread but also yeast need macro and micro nutrients. I have had trouble getting my yeast reactors to work in the past and when I added some plant ferts to the mix the generator actually worked! So now I always add a little bit to my generators.
 

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My settings pop up threads for which I have participated,
so yes I am still following.

I would be interested in your formula including the
macro/micros you are adding. While I would not use
that formula for sour dough starter, I am still interested in
the most efficient DIY C02,
and may add it to my jello litre. Thanks :)
 

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I use 1 cup sugar, 1 tsp. yeast and 5 ml (1 tsp) nutrafin plant ferts. I've tried crushed up vitamins too. The reason I started trying this is because I read an article that compared algae to yeast and said that they have some very similar qualities. One important quality apparently is nitrogen (there is nitrogen in the plant ferts) and trace minerals. I'm not claiming that this will definitely give better results, all I know is I was always unable to get my generators to produce an substantial amount of CO2 until I started adding the other nutrients.
 

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I have pondered the similarities of algae and yeast as well.
I seem to grow great quantities of algae; stands to reason
I should be able to grow some yeast. Especially since
I am baking with it every week ;)

Thanks for the recipe, will add it to the arsenal.
 

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Hi everybody, English is not my native language so sorry for
any possible mistakes.

Get the 2L PET bottle and put there 6 full spoons of sugar, 3 full spoons of
starch and a full spoon of baking soda (NaHCO3). Add approx 2 glass of water
and put it into a pot with the water level same as in the bottle. It takes about
15-20 minutes of boiling. Every 5 minutes shake the bottle to mix the liquid.
When the liquid becomes a sort of jelly cool down the bottle and add a tea
spoon of yeast dissolved in the 20 grams of water.

Should last for 1-2 month.
Hi ,
lastly how much water is added - as you have written some 20 grams . Is it 2o grams or 20 mgl.
 

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Hi everybody, English is not my native language so sorry for
any possible mistakes.

Get the 2L PET bottle and put there 6 full spoons of sugar, 3 full spoons of
starch and a full spoon of baking soda (NaHCO3). Add approx 2 glass of water
and put it into a pot with the water level same as in the bottle. It takes about
15-20 minutes of boiling. Every 5 minutes shake the bottle to mix the liquid.
When the liquid becomes a sort of jelly cool down the bottle and add a tea
spoon of yeast dissolved in the 20 grams of water.

Should last for 1-2 month.
Hi ,
lastly how much water is added - as you have written some 20 grams . Is it 2o grams or 20 mgl.
 

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Here is my recipe:
2 cups sugar (.25l)
6 cups tap water (not RO) (1.5l)
.25 teaspoon yeast (1.25 ml)
pinch of dry ferts or a little bit of liquid ferts.
I heat about half the water to boiling, then mix the sugar and water in a mixing bowl, stirring until the sugar-water is clear. Add most of the rest of the water (cold) to cool off the sugar-water mix.
Start the yeast in .25 cup of tepid water (see instructions on the yeast for the correct temperature.) Do not expose the yeast to high temperature. Allow the sugar-water to cool before mixing.

For the starch version, use most of the water to heat the starch, then pour the sugar into the hot water to dissolve it. I am not sure the sugar should be cooked, though the double-boiler method seems better than a stove-top method, if the soda bottle will handle the heat.

The 20 grams or 20 milliliters of water is just enough to dissolve the yeast. The exact quantity is not important.
 
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