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Probably some of the Cryptocoryne, such as C. beckettii, C. walkeri (lutea) or C. wendtii, can hold their own under those conditions. The old fashoned large amazon swords, Echinodorus amazonicus or E. bleheri are also quite tolerant of low light. If you can get it, try Hygrophila polysperma. If that can't grow, then you are really limited to the lowest of the low light plants, such as Microsorum (Java fern) and the above Crypts. . If H. polysperma can grow, then probably Bacopa carolinia can, too.
 

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Steve,

Can't you use that 96 watt retina burner on a tank you want to be a high light tank? It seems like such a waste to cut back on all that light so that you have a low light tank. You are going to have to raise the light four or five feet above the tank!

I have seen three foot 30 watt T 12 fluorescents. They are not common, but you could probably find them at Home Depot or some kind of electrical outlet. One or two of them would be just right for your 30 gallon.

The organic matter in the soil is not going to produce very much CO2 for very long. After a few weeks, most of the CO2 will come from the fish food, and that will not be very much. The plants during the day can lower the CO2 content until the partial pressure of CO2 in the water is actually less than the partial pressure of CO2 in the atmosphere (about 0.2 mm Hg). Under these conditions, aerating the tank will increase the CO2 levels. Only plants that are adapted to growing in crowded, sunny ponds, where there is little or no water moving through and competition for CO2 is high are able to extract enough CO2 to grow when the water is in equilibrium with the air.

Of course, there is no reason why you can't have a high light, non-CO2 enriched tank. Good plants for that would be Eigeria, Najas, Vallisneria, Ceratophyllum. There is a danger of the pH getting too high for fish in a tank like that, however. I once had a tank like that, with some zebra danios, and, one day I noticed one fish dead, and the others looking sick, and the pH turned out to be 9.6. The other fish recovered when I got the pH down to between 7 and 8 with CO2.
 
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