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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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Dutch another route you can take is getting an m42 adapter, this will allow you to use older lenses such as the Vivitar Series 1 90/2.5 . This is considered to be still one of the best optical lenses. Of course using an adapter you will need to set your camera to M and do everything manually but you can save a ton of cash this way. I would also highly suggest a tripod and macro focusing rail if you're going to go super shallow.



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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok wait, I am new to getting serious in photography so let me sort junk out before I just dive in lol!

Right now I have a Canon EOS T1i
And attached to that is a EFS 18-55mm lens w/image stabilizer, then in front of that is the ultraviolet lens, attached to the zoom lens.

OK got my parts situated and sorted out. I went on amazon and looked at some extension tubes, BUT thing with them is they seemed to not be as Focused? meaning they were a bit blurry I think on most of them, have yet to look at the m42 adapter, I have a VERY high grade/expensive/etc Tripod so checkmark that, I saw some of the rails ill look into that, but that isn't a "need" I don't think.
What if I got a lets say.. 60mm macro lens (cannon of course) and then attached extension tubes to that?
What I'm looking for is EXTREMELY good focus and very define close up images.
 

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What’s going to get you great focus and sharpness with macro is lots of light, super steady camera and the ability to fine focus. Of course good glass is going to help but ultimately you need to be super steady. I would also suggest a pocket diffuser so you can get a lower iso


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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What's going to get you great focus and sharpness with macro is lots of light, super steady camera and the ability to fine focus. Of course good glass is going to help but ultimately you need to be super steady. I would also suggest a pocket diffuser so you can get a lower iso

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Do you suggest a pocket diffuser? link by any chance to one you think is really good? $$$ isn't an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

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hm.
like open the blinds or something? sorry I'm confused since I'm a noob :-?

And what will that do anyway? wanna know it all!!! lol

edit:
just saw the link I didn't see it before I feel dumb now lol.

So how would I use that? and how would I know where to position it?
I am assuming you will be shooting your plants in your greenhouse and outdoors so with this type of diffuser you will be positioning it over your subject and having your direct light source going through it. This will give you nice even lighting over your subject.



Of course there are many different ways of shooting macro just depends on what you're after. The canon EF 100mm 2.8 is my favorite lens which on a cropped sensor would actually be like 160mm and you would be focusing in millimeters. The 60mm is more versatile and you could use it for portraits etc. Below are some examples of what a 100mm on a cropped sensor looks like various corals from my old salty life


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Another factor to consider in your considerations is the depth of field in macrophotography. As you can see in the nice NorCalnomad, your depth of field becomes very shallow. There is not much you can do about this besides focus stacking which is to make multiple images of a static object with a different focal point and then use a program to stack them. This only works with static objects. If you try to shoot fish, it does not work. Also if you have moving object, your autofocus does not help anymore very much because simply moving with the handheld camera changes your focus point rapidly. The 100mm 2.8 Canon is an excellent macro lens as NorCalnomad already suggested. You might be able to get the old version for a reasonable price.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Stunning photography on those corals. I want to go into SW so bad with a 10g nano or something but holy s*** its $$$!! Not saying this hobby isn't, ive easily invested 2k into my nano fluval and my dutch tank lol MIN.

Thanks for the how-to-picture as well.

This would be for indoor use, taking macro pics mostly of my plants inside the tank, and taking pics of the tank itself as a whole like an FTS for example.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Another factor to consider in your considerations is the depth of field in macrophotography. As you can see in the nice NorCalnomad, your depth of field becomes very shallow. There is not much you can do about this besides focus stacking which is to make multiple images of a static object with a different focal point and then use a program to stack them. This only works with static objects. If you try to shoot fish, it does not work. Also if you have moving object, your autofocus does not help anymore very much because simply moving with the handheld camera changes your focus point rapidly. The 100mm 2.8 Canon is an excellent macro lens as NorCalnomad already suggested. You might be able to get the old version for a reasonable price.
the budget of only about 400$ still applies to the actual fixture lol, cant afford the good ol' 800$!!!

https://www.keh.com/shop/canon-100m...L9tvS4Or3_yLdO6zoVabF3bDkNXxGd4waAtdOEALw_wcB here it sells pretty cheap but quality.... eh?...

Also again, what about this 1 https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/ef-s-60mm-f-28-macro-usm
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
yep I don't mind how close I actually have to get as long as its not practically touching the lens.
Ill check the link in the morning. THANKS!
 
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