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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering if one could use mangroves to reduce organics in freshwater tank. This won't be necessary for a high-lighted tank, but what about the low-tech setups. How effecient are these plants at sucking up nitrates(I heard they are better than protein skimmers in SW!), are they better than regular emersed plants? I'm interested in this method in an attempt to reduce water changes on my low-tech setup.
 

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I believe it is the opposite of what you said for most people...that they are actually much LESS efficient than protein skimmers. A large specimen will do something, but those piddly little seedlings most people have arent't going to do diddly (at least they didn't for me...) They seem to grow really slow too.
 

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Several years back I added mangroves in my sump on a reef tank with separate lighting. The only filtration on this tank was a 6’ tall protein skimmer. I left the skimmer running and did not notice and difference in the amount of dissolved organics that were removed. I can’t say for sure that it helped or not but I kept them because it seemed cool. I don’t know if I would try that on a planted tank for several reasons. I am not a believer of using sumps on a planted tank as much as I like using sumps and I believe they would compete for nutrients with the plants.

And yes as mentioned they do grow slow.
 

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You would get more mileage out of growing houseplants with their roots in the water. Mangroves are UGLY plants and once they put on some size, will brush the ceiling. I had 10 in a tank a few years ago and finally gave them all away.

James Purchase
Toronto
 

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Mangroves grow too slow to be of any use for tanks for nutrient export.
Water oak, Cypress etc are poor for the same reasons also.
They are great for long term storage in wetlands though.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Are plants from the Eichhornia genus the most effecient at reomving N? I think I read it somewhere on the krib, but I can't remember if it was ammonia or nitrate.
 

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Mangroves are more a conversation piece than anything else. I have had good success with houseplants from the genus Syngonium. They grow quickly and fry love the root system.

Furthermore, I have read that Gymnocoronis spilanthoides (AKA Oakleaf Plant) is supposed to be a good nutrient sink---I just got some in stock and a few of my customers have will let me know. Anybody seen this? :?:
 

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Spade leaf plants are weeds, they are noxious in some regions, but I do not expect them to be placed on the list in the USA for most places.

Emergent plants are far more efficent nutrient sinks/exporters than any SAM's(Submersed Aquatic macrophytes).
These (emergent plants) are used for wastewater wetland removal systems.

Regards,
Tom Barr

www.BarrReport.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Tom I just read all your posts on how you used Spathiphyllum wallisii to eat up nitrates. Do you recommend the sump be maze-like?
 
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