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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Another Zapins article that I edited. Comments, as always. Paul, could you comment at all? I believe you've seen this one quite a bit down where you are and have had a lot of experience growing it.

'Bold' article (by me) coming soon.

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Micranthemum umbrosum is originally from the USA and can be found in most of the southeastern states from Texas to Florida to Virginia in small ponds, ditches, and streams. While it has been in the hobby for quite some time, it has only recently become more popular, as aquariums providing the conditions it requires have become commonplace.

While occasionally tricky to acclimate, M. umbrosum is not particularly demanding apart from its appetite for light. A relatively intense level is required to grow it well, with two watts per gallon being the minimum recommended. If exposed to inadequate lighting conditions, the plant's lower leaves will drop off or develop holes. At the same time, the stem will become brittle and fracture, causing small pieces to float up to the surface where the light is more intense. This plant can be grown without CO2, although the growth rate will be greatly slowed and the leaves will be smaller.

Once M. umbrosum's basic requirements are met, it becomes an extremely easy plant to propagate. Simply cutting the plant at any point along a main stem and planting it in the substrate will shortly result in new roots and a separate plant. M. umbrosum tends to produce new stems at a fairly high rate. New stems form at the base of leaves a few inches away from the growing tip and can be promoted to form by pinching off the growing tip itself. Fairly dense patches of M. umbrosum can be produced by encouraging new stems to sprout in this way. Emersed propagation can be achieved, but high humidity and a wet substrate are required.

M. umbrosum is normally used in an aquascape toward the middle or back of the aquarium. With extremely high light, it may be coaxed into growing prostrate in the foreground.
 

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it looks good to me. The only thing is growing prostrate, I've never been able to do it like H. micranthemoides.
 

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Cavan, Did you get my PM about M. umbrosum? My experience with local plants was that they did grow horizontally or close to it with a lot of side branching when given lots of light, nutrients, CO2 and room, but they could disintegrate rapidly before other aquarium plants showed signs of damage when tank conditions were not ideal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, I got it, thanks. I'm going to try to incorporate that and finish it all up with a big update later. :clap2:
 

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I concur on the rapid disintegration. If you neglect it and it gets shaded, bye bye bush. My bushes also tended to 'disintegrate' at the base if it got too big and started floating....


btw, if Zapins continues doing a good job, and if we have the means, a possible 'thank you' gift would be giving him a Pet. He inquired about it earlier.....
 
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