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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have done a few trimming and took away a few spieces since last time I posted here. The tank looks like needs another major trimming, so I look for more critics from the current status of the tank. Currently, I plan to trim back the right hand side to let the E. Stellata be a bit more standing out on the picture, and plan to put a few large driftwood hanging from top going down into the water to create a riverbank feel.



Any ideas, and critics are more than welcomed!

Thanks
Kenneth

Larger picture can be viewed here
 

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Looking good, albeit a bit chaotic and unruly. This is a very busy tank and there is a lot going on in there.

Personally, I would continue working on the midground section to try and cover up all those unsightly/dark lower stems.

From the photo, there seem to be way too many species of narrow leaved plants jumbled in there. Take out some of those extraneous species.

I am assuming that the large sword is the star of the show? The leaves look like they are flowing in a current --movement in a static photo. :)

Carlos
 

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You either have too many species or too many small groups of the same species set apart in the tank. Growth and health look great. If you find a focus for your tank it will certainly look spectacular.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for the comments and opinions. to be honest with you, i started this tank with a rough plan in my mind, which... well... roughly looks like this. but as plants grown and the layout natural evolved, more attention to individual details is needed to make improvement. and this is the point i began to feel a little lost. i seriously didn't know what to do with the tank, and my mind really went blank when i was trimming and tried to make a few improvement. Carlos' comment is extremely useful, i really should do something about the midground to tidy things up. while also thanks to murphy, yes, a focus is definitely needed, and i should start get it a serious thought.

i admit that there are too many species of plants, and definitely need to cut down a bit. however, personally, i love busy pictures, i like things with lots of going on, and lots of places to be explored. that's what i tried to do. the problem i am facing now is that while the layout is busy enough, i am unable to make "busy" as a subtle element surrounding a main focus. any thoughts or comments on this?

thanks very much for taking time to comment my bad picture though. :D
Kenneth
 

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I think it is possible to make your tank look 'busy' without looking 'messy', and presently that might be a good priority to take care of. I understand what you mean. You could do an elimination of some plants that made it 'messy'; either give them away or sell them off on auction. A great way to make money toward your plant-keeping fund:) Take, for example, the so called 'lawn'. You have more than one kind of lawn in your tank. I don't know what plants you prefer for lawn, but for me I like the lilaeopsis?! on the right; that little matt-looking thing. So that could be a start of your plant elimination endeavours. Good luck and I hope to see an update! To tell you the truth, I loved it from the start as everything appears real healthy and nice looking. Just have to make it more subtlely busy as you've said so yourself. Its got great potential; somehow my mind tells me so!

Paul
 

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While you wait for your crypts to form a midground you can practice trimming your stem plants with a dutch taper. This will help your midground transition problem. You could also make better use of contrasting plant morphologies to make distinctions between species more interesting in your photo. In a photograph, many fine leafed green plants placed beside one anouther emphasizes their similarities more than when a tank is viewed in person. I think this may be why your critics ask for more focus. Perhaps their opinion would change in person.

One common problem is the wall effect, that background plants make a solid flat wall. To fight this tendancy try to create overlaping species groups that make some areas advance or receed. Varying height also helps reduce the flat wall look. Yes, you have done this some... but more emphasis on contrast will flatter your photograph's initial impact.
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Jeff
 

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I would say limit the number of plant species to like 5 large groups. There is a quite a few main groups but then it seems there are too many stray plants without a gang of similars.
 
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