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Not clear

Are you talking about the Regulator or the electronic Solenoid Valve?

Skipper_Roy
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Left C said:
I've got two and no problems (knocking on wood). It's made by Ronco; I'd swear it. Set it and forget it. Well, almost. I've had them for four months now and I've had to fiddle with the needle valve only a few times.

I've got mine connected to the Milwaukee controller so I really don't have to worry about it. Before I got the controller I found myself getting up in the middle of the night checking pH. I'd check it in the mornings and afternoon too. That's way to much worry. I like having these controllers with it. That's the way to go IMO.

But, when I first got them; I knew my starting bubble rate because I was using the same diffuser. I found that they held pretty steady and my worries were basically unfounded. It's a really great unit!

PS: My first one came from Aquatic Eco Systems and the directions were in English. My second one came from the Drs and like you said, the directions were in Chinese. That's a little weird don't you think?
 

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Hi All,

I just got my azoo regulator delivered this week. Like someone above said, mine also had only the chinese instructions. Would anyone be able to scan their English instructions for me?

It probably seems like a silly question however this is the first time I have used a pressurized system so I am new to all this. :)

Cheers,
Mark.
 

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^^ yeah there are no directions!!

it kinda sucks....

im using mine on a paintball cylinder, just screwed it onto the cylinder (it has an inline on/off) with 1 washer

i'd imagine with a normal CO2 cylinder you just place 1 washer and then screw it onto the cylinder, open the valves, plug the solenoid in and then play with needle valve to get desired bubble rate

i'm wondering though, is it necessary to use something like a wrench to tighten the regulator into the tank valve?
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Most airline tubing and CO2 tubing for our regulators should be around 3/16" inner diameter.

The floating needle valve issue resulting in an inconsistent bubble count hasn't been an issue for me. I have two Azoos, and both seem to work well right out of the box and with the solenoid on a timer. My bubble count is an average of 3 bps and attached to a glass diffuser.

When I had the floating inconsistent bubble count with my Milwaukee Regulator on a timer, I've just had the bubble count way up until it regularly came back down to a consistent count. I think with any regulator with its solenoid on a timer for evening shut-off can produce a shifting bubble count. It just takes some time fiddling with it. You may not get it to the exact count, but it'll get to the point where it's good enough for our purposes. This may work for you if you are having an issue with the Azoo. Another possible solution is to get a clippard needle valve for that finer control you desire. Between these two regulators, Azoo still gets my vote for the ease of setting up, but I still would buy both.

Lastly, installing the Azoo will require one (1) washer between the cylinder and regulator fitting. Take a wrench and attach the regulator until the nut can no longer move. As stated earlier, this will ensure that the washer creates a seal to prevent CO2 leaking. Once you do this, it's as simple as opening up the CO2 cylinder valve, and then opening the needle valve to get the bubble count you want.

-John N.
 

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Hi All,

I just got my azoo regulator delivered this week. Like someone above said, mine also had only the chinese instructions. Would anyone be able to scan their English instructions for me?

It probably seems like a silly question however this is the first time I have used a pressurized system so I am new to all this. :)

Cheers,
Mark.
I have two of the Azoo regulators. My first one came from aquaticeco.com and the instructions were in English. My second one was from the Dr's and the directions were in Chinese just like yours.

The English directions are simple. You just tighten it down with the washer in place, cut on the CO2 tank, plug in the solenoid and then set the needle valve.

I haven't had any major fluctions in the settings that I am aware of but all of them are hooked up to Milwaukee regulators.
 

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John N. said:
Lastly, installing the Azoo will require one (1) washer between the cylinder and regulator fitting. Take a wrench and attach the regulator until the nut can no longer move. As stated earlier, this will ensure that the washer creates a seal to prevent CO2 leaking. Once you do this, it's as simple as opening up the CO2 cylinder valve, and then opening the needle valve to get the bubble count you want.

-John N.
Sorry for diging this thread up, but my CO2 cylinder will be arriving in a few days, and like others have stated, my directions for the regulator were in chinese. So this is what understand from the above post:
1)put 1 washer between the cylinder and regulator fitting.
2) take a wrench to the big, heavy brass nut (right?) until it can no longer move.
3) Open the CO2 cylinder valve FIRST, THEN open the needle valve.

Is that all? I thought opening up the CO2 cylinder valve first will damage the regulator?

Can someone clarify?'

thanks
 

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Sorry for diging this thread up, but my CO2 cylinder will be arriving in a few days, and like others have stated, my directions for the regulator were in chinese. So this is what understand from the above post:
1)put 1 washer between the cylinder and regulator fitting.
2) take a wrench to the big, heavy brass nut (right?) until it can no longer move.
3) Open the CO2 cylinder valve FIRST, THEN open the needle valve.

Is that all? I thought opening up the CO2 cylinder valve first will damage the regulator?

Can someone clarify?'

thanks
When you attach the regulator to the CO2 tank, use a big wrench. That is a big nut so it takes a lot of torque safely. I use a crescent wrench, about 14 inches long, and tighten it as much as I can. Then after an hour or two I try to tighten it more.

Some cheap regulators, such as the Milwaukee one, will have the low pressure gage damaged if you open the CO2 tank valve with the regulator adjustment not backed off completely. For that particular regulator you can just remove the adjusting knob before attaching the regulator to the tank and opening the tank valve.

Needle valves are not shut off valves - a good one may be damaged if you try to close it completely. It just needs to be nearly closed, primarily to avoid sending a blast of CO2 down through the CO2 tubing, reactor and the water.

With regulator adjusted to zero pressure, attach regulator to CO2 tank. Check that needle valve is nearly closed. Open CO2 tank valve all the way - then turn it about a quarter turn back towards closed. Adjust regulator to give outlet pressure of 15 - 30 psi. Adjust needle valve to get the bubble rate you want. Do a soap solution check for CO2 leaks, leaving the solution on all of the possible leak places for several minutes then checking for little mounds of bubbles indicating a leak. Recheck the outlet pressure and bubble rate frequently - every hour or so - for the first several hours after starting it. You may need to readjust during that time. Recheck it again the next morning. You may need to readjust again. After a couple of days the bubble rate should remain steady.
 

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1)put 1 washer between the cylinder and regulator fitting.
2) take a wrench to the big, heavy brass nut (right?) until it can no longer move.
3) Open the CO2 cylinder valve FIRST, THEN open the needle valve.

Is that all? I thought opening up the CO2 cylinder valve first will damage the regulator?

Can someone clarify?'

thanks
It shouldn't really matter unless you have the solenoid on. In my case, when I attach the regulator to the tank I always have the solenoid off. Before you begin to turn on the co2 just make sure that the needle valve is open and not completely closed. The steps you listed above is correct.
 

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If your output pressure is constant but the flow varies, it is the fault of your needle valve or diffusor. There should be a linear, stable relationship. If you are having flow problems please mail me off list with details of your setup. dave1 at wcf dot com
 
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