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It's too early to tell, but you have done quite a bit right. Thank goodness I don't see any driftwood!

Jar looks sealed. You need gas exchange. I would take the lid off and lower the water level an inch.

Make sure that the light is on for at least 11 hours/day.

Make sure that your water has medium hardness, GH greater than 4-5 degrees (i.e., 70 ppm CaCO3). If you are using R.O. water or a house water softener, then Val, being a hardwater plant, would be the first to show its unhappiness. Ultra-soft water is a common problem for people living in New York, Seattle, Raleigh, all cities where the water is too soft. Water without calcium will actually kill hardwater plants (my book, p. 114).
 

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I would just wait. Even if your water is too soft, the soil may release enough calcium into the water for the plants. Therefore, I would advise not changing the water unless you feel you have to. Increasing water hardness is complicated and may be unnecessary.

If ALL the plants collapse, then I would start worrying about water hardness. In that case, investigate your water department or talk to a local plumber. A basic rule of thumb: If water source is ground water or from desert area, it will be sufficiently hard. If it is surface water from a rainy region, it may be too soft. Ideally, you should know whether your tapwater is hard or soft before growing aquarium plants. All USA municipal water department release statements on the Internet about the chemistry of their waters. You can always phone them.

I would give the plants two weeks. By then you should know whether your venture worked out or not. Remember that planted aquariums are complicated and have hundreds of variables. Some plants may adjust, others may not.

In Summary: I applaud you for starting out small, using soil, lots of good growing plants, no driftwood, and consulting with this forum.

Write back in a couple of weeks with your results and we can go from there.
 

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There are a few recent-ish threads on the forum about increasing water hardness. There is a recipe in Ecology of the Planted Aquarium to increase hardness, there are Wonder Shells which are dissolvable "shells" that increase hardness, or you can try using crushed coral/aragonite/etc (although this tends to release more slowly and may not be adequate on its own, depending on your base water parameters).

Couple of threads that may interest you:
Thanks for posting this. It shows that increasing water hardness is complicated--and to be avoided if possible. :)Hopefully, her tapwater has adequate hardness and/or her soil is releasing enough calcium, magnesium, etc to compensate for the potential problem of ultra-soft water..
 
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