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Discussion Starter #1
This is the shrimp that has eggs. I discovered it this morning. Quite excited. It be nice to have a new generation of shrimp. I never planned on any having eggs nor any ideas on raising them?


The 55 gallon planted aquarium, the shrimp came from, housed about 15 guppies, 6 corys, 1 yo-yo loach, 10 shrimp.
When I located the shrimp in the 55 gallon tank, I managed to gently net her over to the 20 gallon breeding tank with sponge filters.
:yield:




this tank already holds the same species of shrimp as well as a few cherry. I am hoping to keep it separate. There are male guppies to the right of the tank divider. Somehow the baby cory cat finds away through a small opening. So far the male guppies haven't found it. I should find a temp home for the male guppies, seeing as they will surely munch down on the clutch of eggs, if and when they should hatch. Any advice for this clutch of eggs to survive?
 

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They are a significant amount of work to raise. Do a search on raising amano shrimp and you should find some interesting articles. My first attempt at raising them was unsuccesful. I am about to have a go at my second try. My females both have had eggs for three weeks now, so anyday they should drop them.

As far as doing anything right now, there really is not much you can do until the eggs hatch. That is when you need to put them in the saltwater. I have a few articles bookmarked on my other computer that I can post links to later if noone else gets back to you. I found them, I think, by doing google searches and searching the forums on here.

Good luck!!!
 

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Amano shrimp larvae require brackish water to survive. If they hatch in freshwater, all of them will die.

Keep in mind that they have thousands of eggs, just in case some of them don't survive.
 

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Actually, I was reading up on them and the larvae can live in freshwater for up to an approx. 8 days. Within this time, you need to move them into water with around 30 ppm of salinity. Some suggest 17, but the article for breeding them said 30 ppm has a higher success rate.

What you can do is transfer the pregnant amano into a small 1 gallon tank, a few days before expected release. Once she releases all the eggs (which I believe takes 1-2 days), you remove the adult and put her back into the main tank. Then, you can change the 1 gallon tank into a brackish water tank for the larvae to grow. They can take on full force brackish water instantly, without having to be acclimated. Then you need to feed them green water and other microscopic foods. It takes about 40-60 days before they begin turning into mini shrimp. And you need to wait about another 20-30 days before you can slowly begin changing their water to freshwater with each water change.

You can google "Amano shrimp breeding" to find out more :)
 

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That is a gnarly process! I didnt know this is how they breaded although I did know that they breaded in brackish water or something along the lines of that. wrkucera good look with this sounds like a long hard process but it will probably be worth it if you decide to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
this sounds like a pita! thanks but, until i have the time and luxury to do so, forget it. Maybe some other time. time....

thanks everyone for the feedback. im busy enough for now with the tanks that i currently run.;)
 

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I read a pretty good article about raising these guys. But he put the Amano's in Full Salt water like around 32ppm. I will try to find the article but hen he compared it with brackish water Salt Water Percentage whom survived was Much greater than the survivers in Brackish water.

I will try to find the link but it was awhile ago before I read it.
 
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