Aquatic Plant Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,877 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this here rather than General Plant Discussions because I'm told not many people are familiar with this plant, and I know Cavan knows it since it's in the PlantFinder. :)

I got this ID'd by The old man and AaronT. But I'm curious as to what makes the new leaves 'pucker' or crinkle. The ones in the pic were like that when I got it and I thought maybe it got shaded out. But new leaves are coming on both stems now and they are very 'puckered' or 'wrinkled' as the top leaves in the photo.

I have hard water (Houston tap water), EI dosing, DIY CO2 at 4-8 bps, don't test my water, don't measure CO2, moderately high light (2.6 - 3.2 WPG on a 50 gal). Am I "out of my league" trying to grow this puppy? :rolleyes:



-Dave
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,096 Posts
I personally have never grown Nessea pedicillata, but the crinkled leaves at the top is stunting. Possibly nitrogen? Reading the plantfinder entry, it is slow to recover from deficiencies...possibly that's the case before you received it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
Cavan thinks this is probably Nessaea pedicillata. I have had it for a year. It came wrongly labeled (which is normally the case here). Anyway if it is then my experience with it is that it is easy to grow - once rooted. Getting the stems to root is difficult as they tend to float, but if you anchor them with a stone the plant roots well. Taking stem cuttings from the first, I have been able to establish it in various of my tanks- some with CO2 some without and variously lighted - direct sunlight to 2 WPG.

Now the "very 'puckered' or 'wrinkled' as the top leaves in the photo" complain of Davemonkey is something which I have seen soon after replanting. Once the plant settles down this peculiar growth disappears.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,877 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Both posts are good news, then. The stems came VERY well rooted. If it's prior nutrient deff., I'll wait it out and keep rockin' on.

Thanks,
Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,308 Posts
Hi davemonkey,

When my Rotala, Bacopa, and Ludwigia had a problem that looked like what is happening with your plant (small and deformed leaves) I found the addition of Ca and Mg resolved the problem.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,398 Posts
I'm not sure I'd add that if his water is hard already. Seattle water is a whole lot different (soft). It could be that his CA/MG ratio is out of balance and may need to be corrected (3/1 or 4/1 is best). Some sensitive plants like that don't like too much magnesium. Or, it could be that he's overdosing K and preventing proper calcium uptake. More details would help.

Nothing screams that there's something wrong with macros, but more micros might help, at least with color.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,877 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hmm, it could be the K. When I went to 'dry' I've continued to add a little liquid K because I thougth the ratio would be better after looking at what I was getting based on the fertilator (EI with dry + 10ml Flourish Potassium) . I will discontinue the extra K and see if that helps.

The picture came out more "green" than what is really present. (Camera exposure) . In reality, the leaves have a bronze/pink-like hue with green undertones.

Here's something else that may or may not matter. In addition to CSM+B, I'm adding .25 tsp of iron chelate per week. Would mixing the Fe with the CSM+B be getting something out-of-whack?

Oh, and here's something I forgot to mention: When I set this tank up, I decided to "play around" a bit. I've got 1/4" clay-loam (plain yard soil from my yard...should not have any chemicals in it) under my substrate. It is considered to be a soil with high natural fertility. Would that 1/4" layer be enough for me to need to adjust the normal EI recommendations? I have not adjusted anything as of yet other than the extra K I've been using.

Thank for all the good info so far.

-Dave
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top