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Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to figure out the best type of filtration for my new tank. It's a 90gallon bow front reef ready tank. Right now I have 125gallon wetdry filtration by ProClear. Lets consider this tank in the low tech group with only a pair of 54W T5 on it now.
I'm not liking the noise from the overflows to the wetdry but I'm going to try a couple of cheap solutions to eliminate that. My main question is, will the wet dry be sufficient? Or should I invest in a canister filter (something like FX5) and plumb it into the overflows? Maybe the wet dry with some type of additional filtration for water polishing (adding a lifeguard filter or a small canister to polish the water in the sump before it gets returned to the main tank).

any info would be helpful. I've fairly familiar with aquariums since I've had a saltwater tank until my recent move but from saltwater to freshwater planted is a whole new ballgame.

thanks,
jeff
 

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The open top was my concern. You can make any thing work, but others are more efficient. Plant tanks do not require a whole lot of filtration. The whole wet/dry seems over kill. But work with what you have.
 

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I'm going to stick with the wet dry for now. Use it for a while. If I like it and everything is going good, then I'll stick with it but if the opposite happens, then I'll switch to a canister.
 

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I think the best thing for now is work with any available resources then improvise later on. Just dont forget to do the regular water change which is very important specially for new tanks:rolleyes:
 

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I think the best thing for now is work with any available resources then improvise later on. Just dont forget to do the regular water change which is very important specially for new tanks:rolleyes:
I never do water changes in a newly setup tank until at least 2 weeks after the cycle is complete.

Even if planted heavily, you will get elevated ammonia levels. If you are changing the water frequently, you are removing the ammonia which can delay the colonization of bacteria in your aquarium.
 
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