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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All these are on Rex Grigg's Site, Please no Flaming i am NOT a Mister Fix it kinda guy and have NO CLUE what these things do. So Please Explain What each Does and Why its needed, i feel that i should have a base knowledge and Working understanding before i try to Set one of these up on my tank and kill everything with CO2 Poisoning!

Controlled Regulator

Needle Valve

Low Pressure Regulator

Manifold

Solenoid

MK I Perma-seal
 

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Controlled Regulator
A regulator allows you removal of the gas from the cylinder via a controlled method, rather than just opening up the valve and letting all the gas escape at once. A two stage (having two dials for tank pressure and outlet pressure) is better than a single stage regulator.

Needle Valve
Allows for the fine control of the gas exiting the tank via the regulator. Without a needle valve you would be using way too much gas for your tank. It allows control down to a bubble per several seconds. Most folks run their tanks in the 1-2 bubbles per second range. Your water hardness and tank size will play a part in this.

Low Pressure Regulator
Related to the answer in the first question. The 'second gauge' of the regulator.

This gives you the ability to run multiple tanks from one CO2 source. Think of it as a 'T' or a 'gang valve' type of apparatus.

An electronic device which will turn on and off the gas flow. Lots of folks will only run the CO2 when their lights are on. If you have hard water, you will find this doesn't do anything for you, as you will probably need to run it 24/7.

MK I Perma-seal
Think of this as an 'o-ring' to create a good seal between the regulator and the tank.

HTH.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A regulator allows you removal of the gas from the cylinder via a controlled method, rather than just opening up the valve and letting all the gas escape at once. A two stage (having two dials for tank pressure and outlet pressure) is better than a single stage regulator.

Allows for the fine control of the gas exiting the tank via the regulator. Without a needle valve you would be using way too much gas for your tank. It allows control down to a bubble per several seconds. Most folks run their tanks in the 1-2 bubbles per second range. Your water hardness and tank size will play a part in this.

Related to the answer in the first question. The 'second gauge' of the regulator.

This gives you the ability to run multiple tanks from one CO2 source. Think of it as a 'T' or a 'gang valve' type of apparatus.

An electronic device which will turn on and off the gas flow. Lots of folks will only run the CO2 when their lights are on. If you have hard water, you will find this doesn't do anything for you, as you will probably need to run it 24/7.

Think of this as an 'o-ring' to create a good seal between the regulator and the tank.

HTH.
Sweet Thank you Bert! Is the Solenoid required or just good to have in Softer water areas? My water is 7.6 PH out of the tap, and add that to all the calcium in my tank = pretty darn hard water.
 

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A solenoid is not required by any means. It's merely a 'nicety' if you choose to only run your CO2 during lights time. If you keep your substrate as I remember you mentioning with all the crushed coral, you will not be using the solenoid. :)
 

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An electronic device which will turn on and off the gas flow. Lots of folks will only run the CO2 when their lights are on. If you have hard water, you will find this doesn't do anything for you, as you will probably need to run it 24/7.
I hate to hijack the thread but can you elaborate a little more on running it 24/7 for people with hard water? What you define as hard water? I run Co2 for 8 hours and the drop checker is always green to yellow, even in the morning, and I'm using certified 4kH water. Should I try running it all day/night?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I hate to hijack the thread but can you elaborate a little more on running it 24/7 for people with hard water? What you define as hard water? I run Co2 for 8 hours and the drop checker is always green to yellow, even in the morning, and I'm using certified 4kH water. Should I try running it all day/night?
4KH isnt Hard water lol. Mine was PH 8.4, GH-15+, KH -23 that is What we call VERY HARD water.
 

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Plants do not always up take co2, just during the photo period. At night they take in oxygen and give off co2. So, with out a solenoid you run the risk of killing your fish from a lack of oxygen if the co2 is on. I guess the solenoid is not a necessity, if you plant not to have any fish. It was once put to me this way, if your co2 is efficient and on at night you fish will die.
 

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I hate to hijack the thread but can you elaborate a little more on running it 24/7 for people with hard water? What you define as hard water? I run Co2 for 8 hours and the drop checker is always green to yellow, even in the morning, and I'm using certified 4kH water. Should I try running it all day/night?
What I found in my tanks (kh10), was that if I only ran it during my photoperiod, I would just be reaching 30ppm by the time lights went out. I didn't want that, so I just run it 24/7. If you do indeed have very hard water, and you're seeing otherwise via your drop checker, I would say to you to make sure all your readings are correct, and that your 4kh water is really 4 kh. It's hard to believe you can run it only during your 8hr photoperiod and have 30 ppm there always. But, hey, if you do, more power to you. :)
 

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A If you keep your substrate as I remember you mentioning with all the crushed coral, you will not be using the solenoid. :)
8-[
This has me worried! When crushed coral is exposed to the elevated levels of acids via injecting pressurized CO2 you will accelerate the amounts of calcium dissolved into the water column. This could cause problems maintaining stable water parameter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
8-[
This has me worried! When crushed coral is exposed to the elevated levels of acids via injecting pressurized CO2 you will accelerate the amounts of calcium dissolved into the water column. This could cause problems maintaining stable water parameter.
No worries i tore it all apart yesterday, their is now nothing but Pea Gravel in the bottom of the tank!
 

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Are we talking about yeast co2 or pressurized. With pressurized it should not take very long, how ever with yeast I could see the slow process. My main concern is not getting 30ppm, It is the oxygen content when the plants do not take in co2 but put it off.
 

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I'm using lab certified 4kh water that I bought online so unless they are lying to me, it should be. I guess I never thought about having it last longer since it doesn't get yellow until the last 4 hours of the light period. I also see a lot of pearling about midway through to day. I'm going to try something different and will increase the CO2 time period to about 12 hours and see what effect that has. I also want to increase the lighting period since i'm only at 6 hours. I'll try to mess with that more once I get back in town for college. I won't run it at night yet but maybe this will help...
 

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I'm sure that your measuring method is correct. I do not question any one's co2 content, I am just stating a fact that plants do not need and will not benefit from 24/7 co2. You will just starve your fish for oxygen, they may live but they will not thrive. What is needed is balance, the balance of an ecosystem. Basically if the the light isn't on there should be no co2 on, hard or soft water has nothing to do with it.
 
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