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I don’t think that’s an aerial leaf. It should be round. It might be ready to send one up soon. When it does, the submerged leaves should melt off so don’t worry.
 

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It could very well be an aerial leaf. I looked up the bulb type (white lily, nymphaea… I referenced from another thread) and the leaves look essentially the same.

It’s also still growing. The leaf will probably go through some shape adjustments, especially once it is emergent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
The submerged leaves are long triangles with deep notches at the base and undulating/ruffled. The emergent leaves are flat, bigger and rounder, which some small triangular ones. Attached are pictures of them in my 6 week-old tank that I've kept outside.

Never noticed this before!
6 wks A.JPG
6 wks.JPG
 

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Well, here's a head scratcher. There is a new growth on my lily. It looks nothing like any leaf that has come before it. It is almost totally stem and is of a different thickness from all the other stems. It has pretty much doubled in length over the space of the last 24 hrs and is easily 9 in. long and snaking along the surface:
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What do you think? An aerial leaf or the much anticipated flower in development?
 

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Feel free to critique what I did yesterday. I decided the little guy needed some more head room. The base of the plant was literally six inches below the surface and all the literature supported my belief that moving it to a deeper part of "the pond" was recommended. However, my choices on how to accomplish that were limited to 1) adding more water to the bowl or, 2) lowering the plant itself.

A few weeks ago, adding more water would have been my go-to solution. More water volume covers a multitude of sins. But, now that I have a few umbrella plants, it would have meant raising their container higher so as not to water log them (and I kinda like the height where they are now.)

So, get ready.

I removed the lily from its pot. It's now resting on the bottom of the tank on top of the mulm along with its friend the anubias. About ten inches of water.

There were surprisingly few roots; evidently it is still subsisting off nutrients inside its rhizome. And btw, judging from the smell, the soil inside the pot was completely anaerobic.

The lily's reaction so far has been to grow the new aerial leaf even faster. It's easily a foot long and showing no signs of slowing down. My real question is what to do with the old soil. Can it be saved? What happens to all the HS2 now that it has been exposed to the air?
 

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In the presence of oxygen, H2S is oxidized by various bacteria to harmless sulfates (my book, pp. 67 and 153).
Okay, that's it. I'm buying my own copy of EPA. I think I can understand it better now that I've gotten my own hands dirty these past six months!
 

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So, is it worth bringing back a bag of red clay the next time I am in North Carolina? I think my big mistake was in using organic potting soil for my lily and becoming too focused on filling the pot. The gravel alone probably comprised about two inches - one on the bottom and another on the top! Would a handful of red clay in the middle have been better or would I still have had to worry about iron leeching out into bowl?
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Your beautiful bowl has clear water, fish okay, plants growing, etc). The lily is now starting to send up aerial leaves. That will help spur growth as it will now be able to bring oxygen into its soil substrate. Are you sure you want to mess with success? Instead, you could set up a small tank or bowl to tinker with new ideas, buy another lily, and play around with NC clay. :)
 

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Your beautiful bowl has clear water, fish okay, plants growing, etc). The lily is now starting to send up aerial leaves. That will help spur growth as it will now be able to bring oxygen into its soil substrate. Are you sure you want to mess with success? Instead, you could set up a small tank or bowl to tinker with new ideas, buy another lily, and play around with NC clay. :)
:love:
73714

That IS the problem with reading your book: it does make you want to try out new things, and I suppose that means, start new tanks (eventually.)
 

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Instead, you could set up a small tank or bowl to tinker with new ideas, buy another lily, and play around with NC clay. :)
I dunno. I just couldn't keep the vision of @dwalstad 's beautiful summer tubs out of my head, so I followed your advice and set up a separate tank for my red clay experiment.

The tank is one-half of an old vegetable crisper from one or two refrigerators ago (don't judge me - I come from a long line of hoarders.)
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The dirt is from my family's farm in southside Virginia (the land has been fallow for about forty years, so agricultural fertilizer shouldn't be a problem) I did add a API root tab for good measure which will be interesting because it says on the front of the package that the tabs contain iron (I mean, does that dirt look like it needs any more iron?):

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The real tale is what a difference it makes when you wait until outdoor pond season is in full swing to purchase your plants. For half what it cost me to buy a rhizome boxed in peat moss three months ago, I was able to buy what surely looked like a red tiger lotus that was already sprouting leaves:


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Essentially, I just repeated what I did with the rhizome many months ago. One big difference I used old bio-filter cylinders to line the bottom o the pot:
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That's not much more than a half inch of gravel as a cap.


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Kind of surprised by how clear the water looks.
 
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