Aquatic Plant Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I noticed something the other day on my java moss, something I've never seen in all the years of keeping it. Hopefully someone else has seen it before. All of the globs are located on the freshly grown tips. The globs seem to last for about two days, then new ones appear at different locations. Each white speck is separate and sways independently with the current. I know the fruiting bodies of mosses don't typically look like this, but then again, no one has ever seen the fruiting body of java moss.



Yes, I know I have pond snails, and no, the globs aren't eggs. :) It's also not rotting food, I don't feed this tank.

Here's a close up or two.





A few details that might help answer my question. The aquarium is a 20 gallon high, half filled with water. Lighting is provided by two 26 watt 5600K CFLs that run for 9 hours per day. The temperature does fluctuate a bit due to being in the garage, but stays about 80-82 degrees F. No testing is done for nutrients, macro or micro. Water quality is maintained via 50% water changes every 6 days, and fertilizing in excess with General Hydroponics Flora Series(have been using for years, works great, Anubias love it) using a 10% hydroponic solution every 3 days. Vinegar is dosed at 5 ml, as a carbon source, daily. There is no filtration, only some rigid airline for circulation.

A little history of the tank might help too. As I mentioned, this tank is in the garage. This winter, my county lost power for nearly two weeks(10 days for me) due to a storm. Temperatures were below freezing. After the power came on, there were two survivors, a Cryptocoryne and some java moss. Could this have cycled the moss, causing it to go sexual?

Now that you've seen the pics, any idea what it could be?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ah, thank you, colonial peritrich ciliates they are indeed. I harvested and cultured some copepods and clam shrimp a while ago. I remember separating a few gravid females of each to start my cultures and thinking I should throw them under the microscope, but never did. One or all must have been carrying them. I guess I lucked out with them being harmless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,438 Posts
They're called "Glockentierchen" in German, I found the translation "bell animalcule" on leo.org. I've noticed that they are often proliferating during periods of bacteria haze.

Off-topic, your moss seems to be a Vesicularia, probably true V. dubyana, the original Java moss. Does it develop spore capsules under water?
Otherwise "Java moss" is Taxiphyllum barbieri in most cases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I dose vinegar as a carbon source, which promotes bacterioplankton, so that would explain why the ciliates are doing so well.

I've never noticed any spore capsules, but while looking through some pictures of mine, I found what may be a capsule. It's on the upper right hand side of the moss. So, my answer is I guess, maybe...



I was looking for a good picture of how it grows to compare with V. dubyana and T. barbier. I would have to agree with its irregular branching pattern and leaf shape, it's very likely V. dubyana.

 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top