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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I believe that I have come across a native riccia in a local pond here in Sarnia Ontario: literally tons of it along the shoreline. Is this possible, or has it been introduced? Has anyone experimented with using these in their tanks?
 

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There are MANY species of Riccia (see HERE ) and most are not mapped in regards to distribution or nativity.

I've got some that I collected out of the San Marcos River and it does very well as a floater.
 

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Wow I had no idea there were so many different types of Riccia...

After looking up their photos I would never have guessed that some of those plants are even Riccia if I saw them in the wild.

Do you have any pics dave of the Riccia you collected?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks for all these replies, Davemonkey, in particular. None of the species pictured on the US Gov. site you give are the one that I have collected. Mine is very fine and 'spidery'; fragile. I'm going to collect some more today and set it up in an old 10-gallon outside.

On the Ontario Provincial Government website there are NO riccia listed as native in the aquatic plants catagory, but I tend to think that this may simply be an under-researched area.

I fear it may be tricky to photograph my riccia well, but I'll try.

No responses on whether anyone has tried using native riccia in their tanks, so I'm taking this as a provisional 'no'.

ep
 

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No responses on whether anyone has tried using native riccia in their tanks, so I'm taking this as a provisional 'no'.

ep
No, it is a "YES". I currently have what I collected in my tank as a floater, and some broken off bits have been swept by the current into nooks of my driftwood and are growing submersed (with the more spidery/fine texture you are referring to). There are a couple others in the Houston Area that have it in their tanks also.
 

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Riccia will look different at different times and when emmersed compared to submersed. I've used it a few times both ways and currently have it in two tanks.

Good find!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Any advice on actually using this stuff? It is full of snails, daphnia, and a bizillion tiny leechs. Definitely leechs. Would there be a "zap-all" method of treating it? I guess this question is El Natural heresy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sorry... late breaking: To clarify, I gathered huge FISTFULLS of this stuff, but seperated these "twigs" in order to give those who might be able to identify the species a clear view in these photos.

There's also a great deal of duckweed mixed in with my sample clump, which resides currently on the back deck in an old 5-gallon with an airstone.

I read worry on the faces of the leeches. Are they on the Net? ep
 

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I've been encouraging such critters in the two tanks that I have such critters hanging out. This is mostly because I am feeding a pair of pygmy banded sunfish, and they will not take prepared foods. They are currently in the 48"/10g tank that also houses toads (Bombina sp).
 

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some do prey on fish but most just eat dead ones. I say just try growing them emersed for a bit to get the leeches out. There of course will be some survivors. But a long enough time with nothing to eat and they will certainly starve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Re: Ontario Native Riccia? Update.

An update on my native Ontario riccia: it grows beautifully in both of my tanks. I have some tied to driftwood and some is floating. It's a terrific bright green... almost yellow if the light catches it in a certain way.
 
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