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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there anyway of removing those snails?
i know puffers and loaches eat snails..
but is there any other less aggressive fish out there that cleans out snails too?
or any other alterative?
 

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Define aggressive. My yo-yo loaches are extremely effective, not aggressive in the least, but definitely playful :)
 

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Blue Gouramis are supposed to be snail-eaters. I haven't any experience with it myself, but any of the morphs should work.
 

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Golden barbs also eat the small snails and the eggs. They cant tackel the ig ones but by the time they are big you can pluck them out by hand. I personally dont have a problem wiht a fw snails. The ones I have never sem to hurt much and they help add ditritis and romove some unwanted algae:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
spituch..what's a blanched cucumber sorry i don't get it..

those fish you guys mentioned above...can it be mix with tetras??
from what i have heard...most of those snail eating fishes attacks tetras..

is those liquid snail killer good ??
 

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Blanching vegetables is a common way to soften them up for algae eaters. Doing this to zuchinni is great food for siamese algae eaters. Cut the cucumber, or better zuchinni, in 3/8 inch circles and boil for 3 minutes. Rinse, dry, and wrap individually in aluminum foil and freeze. When you need to feed your fish just drop one in the tank.

In theory if you find a food that snails like, they will congregate on it when the lights are out. At which time you can snatch them away.

Steve Pituch
 

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Malaysian Trumpet snails will eat pond snail and ramshorn eggs when they find them. Slows the population growth down.

Little bit of wilted lettuce or spinach stuck in a small glass at the bottom will be loaded with snails if left in the tank undisturbed for a day. Lift the glass out and pick.

A few people over on the Planted Tank board claim that their kuhli loaches eat snails. Totally non aggressive but I can't imagine they manage to eat any but very small snails. I did buy 2 the other day to give it a try. Tank is so heavily planted I'll probably never spot them again.

Honestly snails don't bother much. I have them and really don't mind them. They eat the dead and dying leaves and algae and other things fish won't normally touch.

I've got pond snails, ramshorns and a big mystery snail. No snail holes in plants. Constantly see them working over the glass, rocks and substrate. Always on dead, detached leaves or grazing on leaves with a little algae. No harm done, lots of good. Just need to keep a little birth control going.
 

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Yes I agree, snails like the MTS's are very beneficial to a tank, and considered the little earthworms of a tank. They burrow in the substrate and keep it nice and worked for you.

Another sure way to keep snails in check is simply not to overfeed. The more food they get, the more they reproduce.
 

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I have a clown loach in my 20 gallon and it does the job. I had a pest like you can't imagine. I have it in there with guppies, Clown Loaches are not aggressive at all.

The disadvantage is that in 5 years or so it could grow to be 5 inches or more.
 

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Those little pond snails (physids) wreak havock on my tanks. So much so that I've been avoiding keeping a planted aquarium until I recently decided to give it another go. They are even a pest in my non-planted snail tank. (Go figure) They seem to be a constant bother to my mystery snails (pomacea bridgessi) and actually do eat any live plants I introduce to the tank. My mystery snails though won't touch live plant matter. Neither will my red ramshorns (planorbids). As a matter of fact the only way I have found to keep the invading physids at bay is with my red ramshorns. They seem to be able to out compete the invaders and keep thier numbers down in an unplanted aquarium. They are doing such a good job that I may be completely physid free in a few months.

But like JanS said many snail species can be beneficial to a tank. Malaysian Trumpet snails like to burrow in the substrate and keep it loose and free of big peices of waste and leftover food. Red Ramshorns and most apple snails won't touch your live plants unless they are starving. Otherwise they will clean up any unwanted algae, leftover food, and any dead plant matter in the tank. Many applesnails lay thier eggs above the water line too, wich makes it easy to remove the clutches if you don't want anymore snails. Just watch out for species like Canas that are notorious plant eaters. I don't think Columbian Ramshorns are as bad but I think they are a bit more prone to eating plants than say, a mystery snail.


Sorry to dig up such an old post. I didn't realize how far I had dug back. lol
 
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