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Awesome job so far hariom and a great tool side by side with Zapins's diagram, too.
Philosophos said:
Both of these lists/diagrams are missing the most common deficiency I've ever had to deal with; CO2.

Most of it looks like calcium issues, and for the most part those in denial about their CO2 levels (we've all been there) tend to go on and on about their, "calcium deficiency"
nfrank said:
I recently was led to believe that CO2 deficiency can also look like N deficiency - in some plants.
Philosophos said:
It wouldn't surprise me to see it as N. CO2 can look like K+ as well; structural failure causes holes.

Right now I'm showing CO2 deficiency in some staurogyne from changing my flow dynamics. I'd be screaming N, K and Fe deficiency if I didn't know well enough...
I think the way to properly label CO2 on the chart is, just on the right of the current list, block the whole plant and within say: "CO2". I'm serious -- it's by far the biggest macro and, you're right, it can show any of these symptoms.
 

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Very nice. Changing "30 ppm" to "non-limiting" CO2 may be the answer to some of this, hariom.

For Philosophos's points about water flow, could the flow chart have a step that asks if there's proper water flow by the plant? Only an idea.

nfrank,

It is - p12 of Walstad. But the entirety of Chapter 2 "Plants as Water Purifiers" is probably relevant here.
 

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Hey, Martin.

I'm obviously not hariom, but you may have missed his recent thread discussing his new project: http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/...ute-new-calculator-help-formaulas-dosing.html hariom and I have swapped proof of concepts and templates and -- fwiw -- I am impressed and am excited. hariom is a special talent. I would not be surprised if he takes a while to answer to your post considering he is a graduate student and the time of year, fyi.
 

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HeyPK,

Respectfully, I think that diagram is showing H. polysperma as a healthy, living, and starved plant of not just CO2, but all nutrients and light. For example, while I associate the size of the leaves (and plant mass) with CO2 (C being the biggest portion of plant mass), I think that horizontal growth is the result of non-limiting light. A tank already with B or Ca deficiency may exhibit the symptoms of curled leaves, for example, but before the aquarist with a CO2 enriched tank investigates the smaller macros and the larger micros, s/he should look at CO2. For this reason, I think the use of CO2 as a first step is appropriate in hariom's infographic.

I see how this may be different in a CO2 limited tank.

I do really, really, like the idea of using common aquarium plants as standards for deficiencies. However, I would suggest we stick with smaller scaled plants instead of a H. polysperma. For example, R. indica, H. micranthemoides, B. japonica, M. fluviatilis, and Glosso/ET/HC are great indicator plants and also double as excellent pieces for us folks trying to figure out an aquascape. Perhaps we could start a thread or continue this one with what plants we each like and for what indicators, then see if there's a consensus to build upon?

hariom,

I've not seen Philosophous around this or the other forum I frequent. Might tackle toxicity on our proof of concept in a second though.
 

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Thank you -- progress!

I am only speaking of my experience in my tanks, of course, but I pick H. micranthemoides, which will get transparent new growth with trace deficiency and specifically lose it's rather unique candy-apply-green color with low Fe. In reading HeyPK's description above, I would include it and R. mexicana 'Goias' as plants who "droop" with low CO2, which I have seen, but I'm still standing by my light argument and that a plant allowed to fill a space will usually fill a space to ensure it outcompetes its neighbors :)

I also pick R. indica, which, after trimming, will send oblong leaves with N limitation. This can be fine if you're limiting N for whatever reason. Example: younger stem on the right.
 
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