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Both of these lists/diagrams are missing the most common deficiency I've ever had to deal with; CO2.

Most of it looks like calcium issues, and for the most part those in denial about their CO2 levels (we've all been there) tend to go on and on about their, "calcium deficiency"

I think it'd be worth further defining and adding to the list.
 

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It wouldn't surprise me to see it as N. CO2 can look like K+ as well; structural failure causes holes.

Right now I'm showing CO2 deficiency in some staurogyne from changing my flow dynamics. I'd be screaming N, K and Fe deficiency if I didn't know well enough to look at the staurogyne that's not in dense patches. This is in fresh aquasoil with me dosing more than standard EI under mid to low light levels, using tons of flow, a wave timer and a SCWD, so obviously it's not nutrients or nutrient distribution.

This is why I think there needs to be a discussion on the nature of the deficiency, why it manifests as it does, how to spot it, etc. before it just gets dropped on to a chart as a little side note.
 

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I attached mine to the outtake of my XP4 using a 5/8 to 3/4 barbed adaptor. I hung it with some plastic coated wire off the back of the tank, and used a couple of 3/4 inch outtakes. Right now the outtakes are fan-shaped with a ball joint, but I'd like to flip to eductors and modular hosing.

Using a SCWD and Ocean Pulse Duo has made CO2 distribution WAY easier. The 10 second switching allows two viaaqua 480's to run as needle wheels without the CO2 backing up. I've split the duo's outlets to allow for a couple koralia nanos as well.
 

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CO2 is essential to so many compounds that a lack of it causes multiple issues throughout the plant. Look at chlorophyll; by atomic weight it's mostly carbon, by atomic ratio it's still around 2/5ths carbon with a lot of the rest being hydrogen (not exactly hard to come by). Even more of the plants rigid structure depends on carbon, so that fails with a CO2 deficiency too. Gradually developing (days or more) leaf transparency with structural failure always points at a lack of CO2 to me.

NPT's get CO2 issues too, some more than others. Every style of planted tank that I have ever seen has the potential. there's a bit more of a tendency towards K+ deficiency in these tanksbecause it's hard to get without dosing, and the substrate/fish food provides plenty of N and P. Within NPT's, the most popular style is of course El natural. With this method CO2 is gotten around because the system works on not disturbing your tank, leaving lots of organics to break down to produce CO2, and keeping light low. There are mid-day breaks worked in that help quite a bit as well. Even so, BBA happens in these tanks which indicates CO2 issues. It's more often a matter of experience than being of any major method, because the principles are all the same, and the methods are all well tested.

Showing CO2 deficiencies as an entire leaf thing is a very good idea.
 

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Very nice chart, the diagnostic flow chart is a great idea IMO.

I've got a few bits of my own to add, take what you will of it:

Drop checker minimum for me is 30ppm. I like to sit between 30-45ppm, given that toxicity starts in around 60-75ppm. I'm not sure if others feel this way, but that's become my outlook and I figure it was worth mentioning to see what the common consensus is.

It may be worth mentioning moving your drop checker to troubled areas of the tank. I recall on one occasion someone saying that their CO2 couldn't be deficient because it was yellow. I told them to move it over by the ground cover they were having trouble with, and it turned blue. IME the real effort of a planted tank is getting CO2 into the lower parts.

I think it's worth noting that you can get BBA (Audouinella spp.) developing just about everywhere in a tank if CO2 is limiting. I've had a needle wheel modded powerhead pushing directly onto leaves that BBA had taken a good foothold on when under limiting conditions. I had a bright yellow drop checker too. As it turns out, early morning sun at the right time of year was lighting up half the tank.

It'd be worth working in something about mmol PAR because of cases such as this. Your CO2 can be complete perfection, but too much light is always too much light.

Lower leaf shed on stems is possibly worth mentioning; there may be no structural issues to see because the leaves are actually dropping right off the plant.

nfrank is bringing up a good point with toxicity. Column levels of nutrient toxicity are very unlikely; Hoagland stock solutions used in many scientific experiments are 10x EI dosing in the same sort of parameters. There's no point dosing this much, and it will kill the fish while the plants are still happy. Your first symptom of fertilizer OD tends to be dead fish. This is not the only way to poison your plants though. Various plant dips aren't so nice to the plants either, some medications will kill plants while the fish are still fine, some fish can stand brackish conditions where the Na destroys certain plants. Major cases of toxicity can show different symptoms, but in almost every case they end up acting far faster than a nutrient deficiency. For more mild/prolonged cases it tends to be something added repeatedly to the tank.
 
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