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I have a 1200 gallons pond that is infested with hair/ slime algae! The water is actually is very clear (morning), but is infested with hair algae that is killing my water plants. The slime floating algae appears after 4 pm that is when the sunlight hits the pond.
Nitrates are Close to 0, phosphate 0 , Gh 300, KH 150, PH 8.
Any help? (pond is 4 months old)
Gracias! :rolleyes::confused:
 

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Ponds go through a lot of changes in the first six months, and almost all of the changes involve some sort of algae! Try to get as much surface area of your pond covered with emergent plants as possible--water lilies or any of the legal floating plants. Hornwort helps even if it is not emergent. It is a nutrient sponge and suppresses algae by allelopathy. You can also try barley straw in your filter or just suspended in mesh bags floating in the pond. UV sterilizers are supposed to help too, but are very pricey.

I'm new to planted aquariums, but experienced with ponds. Be patient and get lots of emergent plants in there. With the change of season sunlight will be less intense and that will help too.

BTW, thanks again for the shrimp and duckweed at the last meeting!

--Michael
 

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Hey Alex - throw some of that duckweed in your pond :rolleyes:

I put some in mine and in about 2 weeks it was 100% covered! The guppies love it and the Algae all died! Then your next post will be, "Pond Duckweed problem!"

Ric
 

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yep, UV sterilizers and water lilies . that is what my friend did for his koi ponds in his back yard... also now that fall will be here soon. less heat and less sun, so less algae.
 

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I forget the name, but there is some stuff that is basically granules of hydrogen peroxide that has been used successfully to clear ponds. You should read about it a lot more before trying it though... basically you spread it onto the algae and it bubbles like crazy and burns it. Granted, if it lands on the plants, it'll burn through them too. And it's not always good for your fish... thus the need for research... :)

I assume your plants must be potted? Because otherwise it would be a problem to have no nitrates and no phosphates... Generally you want some of both, in a 20:1 ratio in ppm I believe... I know I dose Potassium Nitrate and Monopotassium Phosphate at approximately 4:1 by powdered volume in my tanks. With the exception of BBA, most other algaes are a sign of nutrient surplus and/or imbalance. I don't know what triggers BBA unfortunately.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Guys thanks for the replies!

Today the pond looks not so bad! Of course a cloudy day!
I dropped almost a pound of duck wed 2 days ago! Right now there is pretty much none left! I guess the Koi or mosquito fish are eating it!???:frusty:

I should probably start dosing some nutrients... and see what other kind of algae comes out!:rolleyes:
 

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I can give you some water lettuce floating plant to help absorb the excess nutrients. Just make sure you don't let it get into the water ways. As with most of the plants in our tanks, its on the noxious list.
 

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Alex,

Michael's hit it spot on. Get as many emergents in there as possible. Not only will they soak up nutrients in the water column, but they'll provide shade which will inhibit the algae.

It sounds like the slimy stuff is a type of cyanobacteria. When they get light and start photosynthesizing they'll float to the top. When it gets dark and they stop, they sink. Try your best to scoop them out during the day.

Also, what are your plants potted in? What's the alkalinity (KH) of your water? Ponds are different beasts than aquariums. You really don't want nutrients in the water column unless it's Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, and Carbonate. N and P in the water feed algae.

I'd be happy to come visit and give you some advice on maintenance if you'd like. I used to do pond maintenance for a living. Now I'm looking at the science of it. I like the new job better than the first. :D

Regards,
Phil
 

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Yeah, stay the hell away from Water Hyacinth, you could get into some serious serious trouble. In fact, it's the retailers who sell the stuff that are one of the major impetuses for the White List initiative we were talking about earlier.

If you need a floater for your pond go get some Watersprite from a pet shop. That's still legal and will to just as well as the Water Hyacinth. Other good options are hardy lilies. Put them in a pot with some nice rich substrate and let them grow, grow, grow. Coontail (Ceratophyllum dimersum) is a good floater as well if you're looking to build up biomass and get surface coverage. Likewise, Illinois Pondweed (Potamogeton illinoensis) and American Pondweed (P. nodosus) are natives that send out floating leaves. They'll grow gangbusters, strip nutrients out of the water, and create a mat of floating leaves for shade. The best thing is you can just leave the pots in the pond all year long.

Other natives used in aquaria such as Ludwigia repens, Bacopa caroliniana, and B. monneri are other good options and are regularly available from hobbyists.

Regards,
Phil
 
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