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Spring is in the air and so is the pond season. Besides our native plants, a good many proven and potential aquarium plants can be found in the pond section in fish stores, nurseries and even places like Lowes and Home Depot. I tried Saururus chinensis a few years ago and found it to be a great plant. It takes a long time to fully adapt, but it does, and in my opinion, is nicer than S. cernuus.

This year, I'll probably try Gratiola officinalis (the real one) again along with Justicia americana (related to Hygrophila) and whatever else I can find.

Has anyone else made any pond section discoveries?
 

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You can grow any aquatic in the pond when the temps warm up. Echinodorus get enormous, crypts generally take on a bushier, more compact habit with better colour, and most stems I've tried will have much better substance and color than in tanks.

This year I'm going to try Hemianthus, Micranthemum, and maybe some Glosso. semi emersed to carpet the soil in my marginals and bog plants like Iris and Crinums.

If you're lucky and live in the tropics like Budi, you can have a pond looking like this:
http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/...2356-bdts-planted-pond-picture-intensive.html

Cheers.
Jim
 

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Cavan,

GWAPA went to Maryland Aquatic Gardens last year and picked up a few plants that worked well in the aquarium. Saururus chinensis was one that we got, along with a Lindernia and another Lobilia. They also had 3 or 4 species of Marsalia for sale, much cheaper than a petstore. I also tried a couple other plants who's name's I can't remember
 

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The Lindernia we got is Lindernia grandiflora. It gets hues of reds and purples on the leaves much like the Lindernia sp. 'Indian' that's going around.

One of the Marsileas they had was quadrifolia (the real one that keeps four leaves submersed).

I believe the Lobelia we tried was fulgens?
 

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I am growing Polygonum sp. "sao paulo" in a outdoor pond, it is actually growing in the stream that flows into the pond. It has grown ok so far, but the water temperatures have been pretty cool, hopefully it will take off during summer. It even flowered!!
 

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Like Jim mentioned This year Im going to try some glosso to see if I cant get it to carpet in our stream and along the edges emersed, along with chain sword in the main pond... we will see how that works, I think the biggest challenge most of the time is not getting them to grow how you would like, but rather keeping the koi from eating them and tearing everything up ;) Also plan on some apon. hybrids that should do really well along with what ever stem plant clippings I can afford out of my tank....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm speaking more of new species that we might find for aquariums as opposed to the opposite, although growing stuff outside can indeed be rewarding.

Isn't Lobelia fulgens a synonym for cardinalis? Is it a red cultvar of the latter or something like that?
 

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I saw a Lobelia siphilitica and a variagated variety of Hydrocotyle sibthorpoides at the shop yesterday. Some of the others looked interesting but I would be hesitant to try them submerged.
 

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I found this one at the nursery near my home today. It's labeled as Hydrocotyle 'Nova Zealandiae'. It does appear to be a different species than I've seen before. It's similar in size to sibthorpiodes, but slightly darker green. We'll see how it works out as an aquarium plant soon enough. :)

 

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student from malaysia seeking some help

hello..i just sign up in APC and i am seeking some help from all of you. i am a final year student in Science University of Malaysia (USM).. i am doing my final year project right now which is planting hydrocotyle sp(i am not sure about the species) in 9 manger using waste water from the fish tank one more thing,i was wondering if hydrocotyle sibthorpiodes and hydrocotyle sibthorpoides is the same plant?and could someone help me with these plant morphology..and for your information, this plant i've planted do not have fruiting body and no flowers..only the leaves..here i enclosed a picture of my plant
 

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Spring is in the air and so is the pond season. Besides our native plants, a good many proven and potential aquarium plants can be found in the pond section in fish stores, nurseries and even places like Lowes and Home Depot. I tried Saururus chinensis a few years ago and found it to be a great plant. It takes a long time to fully adapt, but it does, and in my opinion, is nicer than S. cernuus.

This year, I'll probably try Gratiola officinalis (the real one) again along with Justicia americana (related to Hygrophila) and whatever else I can find.

Has anyone else made any pond section discoveries?
Don't know if anyone will see this after all these years, but I did, so...

Justicia americana grows here (central TX) mostly as an emergent but in deep water does well submersed - the leaves being paler green and more pointed.
Polygonum hydropiperoides (pretty sure of sp.) also grows well submersed and can be found in the wild underwater, same for Eleocharis spp.
Hydrocotyle verticillata, I have never seen submersed here naturally but does well (like Lobelia cardinalis).
I am trying Frogfruit (Phyla nodosa) submersed, might work.
Marsilea macropoda does Not like submersion.
 
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