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I just revised my 'Small Scale Guppy Breeding' article. It's on my website now. I mention it here (on APC) just in case there might be one or two guppy enthusiasts.

Article describes how I breed my pet fancy guppies. It covers the basics, but it also contains new information on reproduction. Learn why I keep "chase" females with my juvenile males, why one female quickly mated with a new male but her full-sister rejected him... Overall, the article celebrates the guppy's genetic trait of color polymorphism. Unlike breeding methods that emphasize strain uniformity, I work with the guppy's natural tendency to produce different color patterns. This not only makes guppy breeding more fun, but it avoids inbreeding problems and genetic weaknesses. Photo shows some of the males I have produced.
 

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Im just curious if there are any more subtle signs that you look for when considering sick or diseased fish and should they be removed immediately? Some obvious ones i am guessing would be abnormal behavior, lethargy, heavy breathing…
 

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Im just curious if there are any more subtle signs that you look for when considering sick or diseased fish and should they be removed immediately? Some obvious ones i am guessing would be abnormal behavior, lethargy, heavy breathing…
I usually give a sad looking individual fish a few days before removing and euthanizing. I think this is something that you learn only by experience with your own guppies. Every situation is different.

When I first started in 2017, I had 4-month-old males that lay on the bottom suffering from constipation. Young females soon after giving birth had pro-lapsed uteruses or they would just hang at the surface. Days went by and they never got better. I believe they represent "plumbing problems" in the Blue Grass strain that I started out with.

However, I did treat sick fish for Camallanus worms and flukes. These are diseases that popped up and that I actually succeeded in eradicating from the fish. Articles about my ordeal with these diseases are on my website.

I spent the last several years selecting out more robust individuals, weeding out disease, and breeding for greater longevity. It is working!
 

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I know you are a fan of "line" breeding. I saw another way of breeding from Kenjiro Tanaka (Japan) and his Ginga guppies. I can't find the website. He also bred killifish, and so the guppies patterns resembles killifish. But he did not use line breeding. Instead he bred in colonies. So you don't get a single trait, but variations of a trait. I want to create a colony of turquoise Moscow guppies. Because they are full colored and meant to be bigger stronger guppies. Then I also learnt that adding purple Moscow guppies bring out stronger colors. Not sure how that gene pool works. Of course culling is required to get strong best colored fish. Even culls would be interesting fish to sell. The ones you find in local fish shops.....look really sad. Even Endlers look better than the mutts in the local fish shop.
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Does anybody know the value of the material in this document? http://www.petbh.com.br/guppy/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Guppy-Color-Strains_Philip-Shaddock-1.pdf There was very sharp criticism for his work.
I don't understand the criticism of this beautiful, comprehensive book on guppy strains. Shaddock must have spent years collecting the pictures. I'm not an expert on guppy color genetics, so there may be genetic details that inflamed his critics--or stoked their jealousy. As a basic overview of guppy color strains, it is unparalleled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I know you are a fan of "line" breeding. I saw another way of breeding from Kenjiro Tanaka (Japan) and his Ginga guppies. I can't find the website. He also bred killifish, and so the guppies patterns resembles killifish. But he did not use line breeding. Instead he bred in colonies. So you don't get a single trait, but variations of a trait. I want to create a colony of turquoise Moscow guppies. Because they are full colored and meant to be bigger stronger guppies. Then I also learnt that adding purple Moscow guppies bring out stronger colors. Not sure how that gene pool works. Of course culling is required to get strong best colored fish. Even culls would be interesting fish to sell. The ones you find in local fish shops.....look really sad. Even Endlers look better than the mutts in the local fish shop.
Beautiful guppies! Thanks for the photo.

I would not call what I do "line-breeding." Actually, I believe I am doing the "colony breeding" that you describe for Tanaka's Ginga guppies. I interbreed individuals with different variations of color patterns (phenotypes). This is not line-breeding.

If I were line-breeding, I would select one desired phenotype and inter-breed individuals with that phenotype. This can be done with closely related individual (mating of full siblings) called 'severe inbreeding'. OR it can be done with less-related individuals (mating of second cousins), which is called 'line-breeding.'
 

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As a lazy platy breeder I unintentionally use the colony method. I put a group of fish with desired but variable characteristics in a tank and let them go at it. I enjoy seeing what happens, and at some point I may segregate the fish based on what I like. Or not. I haven't switched all my breeding tanks to potted plants, and platies are the devil to catch in a lush Walstad tank, LOL.
 

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:LOL: That is true. Catching them in a heavy planted tank would be hard. Transparent plastic container with a funnel inlet baited with food? I don't want to breed for profit, just want to fill my tank with beautiful high quality guppies. At some point down the track the sheer numbers might require culling and sales. The parents were expensive. But they are doing very well. Even in the quarentine container I already have several babies. A 30 liter plastic bucket with a sponge filter and floating hornswort. 2 males and 3 females. The one male died in the mail.
 

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From memory the Ginga Guppies were bred in what looked like 3x4 meter concrete containers about a meter high. Thousands of them together. There was no seperation of pairs. I saw a Israeli breeder doing something similar. He had a interesting grading method. By width. 7, 6, 5 mm spacers. A method that results in big strong Guppies.
 

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I don't understand the criticism of this beautiful, comprehensive book on guppy strains. Shaddock must have spent years collecting the pictures. I'm not an expert on guppy color genetics, so there may be genetic details that inflamed his critics--or stoked their jealousy. As a basic overview of guppy color strains, it is unparalleled.
Me neither. He went through the trouble of sharing his experience. Some comments were really nasty. Science trolls I guess. I like that he started with Moscow Guppies 😁 I tried to find the origins. But then you get good info, then it vanishes again. The story was of a Russian that kept them in glass jars, heated by a lamp or candle. The breeding of the Moscow strain is not quite clear. How they succeeded in getting the whole fish in colour, the cameleon colour change. There is some info on body shape.
 

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Did you not see my article 'Potted Plants for Fish Breeding Tanks'? The method works very well. Article is on my website.
I did. The primary goal is a planted tank, with beautiful fish. Neon's are bright, but only two colors. The tank can accommodate 200 fish with ease. Moscow guppies is about $20 each. Buying all the fish would be $4,000. So instead I bought three pairs and breed my own colony of 200 fish. :)
I have done it before. Not 200, about 50. And then I introduced a very pretty fish from the pet store.....and you end up with 2 fish left. So this time, no new fish. The five fish should be a reasonable starting gene pool?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
After thinking about what you and Michael wrote, your "colony" method is much different from mine. I carefully plan each pairing and only raise stock from the mating of chosen individuals. Requires a lot of work, time, and more than one tank. Helps to be retired!

Starting with 5 fish could work, but I think the quality will deteriorate after a few years. The results will depend on the starting stock, selection, what your goals are, luck, etc.

It sounds like you are having fun with your Moscows. That's great!

If you have a picture, I'd like to see what they look like.
 

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When they say Moscow Guppies is only a male gene, does it mean if you have a Moscow male with wny female you still get a full Moscow Guppy? Or do Moscow females play a role as well, though not the dominant gene?
 

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Another question. The Moscow females are either blond or grey. Some babies are grey, some are blond, some looking albino and some darker with coloured fins. Males are hard to tell if they are blond or grey. So is the babies random combinations of grey and blond? With blond and blond gene albino, and grey and grey very dark?
 
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