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Thanks. I found this link that are helpful. Emeraldking-aquatics livebearers

That is the females in the small batch. The females of the larger batch look different again. They are all greys, and some half blacks. They have the rounded tail fin either grey or black. Their babies is still small ( about 50 plus now) so it is harder to see.

Do small babies eat the algea from green water? I add finely crushed flakes too. Don't want to polute the water. They seem to survive and grow on that. The half milimeter pellets is still a bit big. The first batch grew to 8mm already on powdered flakes.

I do weekly 25% water changes (20 liter) using the same drip method than for shrimps. Water smell good. Keeping it fresh so they grow fast and stay healthy in quarentine.
 

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I read on your website the following?

"Like my earlier BG breeder males, the two July males did not live long—about 4-5 mos. Irreversible decline began when they rested on the bottom with swollen bellies and lost all interest in food and females."

That is unusual? My guppies definitely lives longer than that. Actually the ones thrown in an external tub and mostly forgotten seems to have been the most vibrant and colourful. Less fish flakes food, more mosquito larvae and algae.

I am guilty of once a day blob of food. So I am working on a 3D printed fish feeder powered by an Arduino. Then program it to give small portions several times a day instead.

This link talks about guppy bloat, sounding similar to Malawi bloat. Usually treated wit Empson salt to get those tummies going. Some Malawi salts have so much magnesium, the fishes have hollow tummies. Going out faster than they can eat.


I will definitely watch those tummies and fast them for a couple of days if they start to look a bit bloated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Your fish look nice. Females look normal.
Bloating can also be due to the fish's inability to digest food properly.
I still overfeed my fish but--since I started breeding for longevity-- I no longer have males that die at 4-5 months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Just posted a revision of my 'Guppy Longevity' article (10 pages) on my website. By breeding only older guppies since 2018, I've now gotten one female (picture) to live over 1 year. She's now 13 months and reproducing normally. Yesterday, I moved her into a new tank with an established breeding group of younger guppies. Overnight, this robust alpha female fought and won for a dominant position in the tank. I've already got progeny from 3 of her batches, but I want some progeny sired by a new male that I like a lot (photo). If I get really lucky, she'll give me some babies by him in a couple months time!

This female represents a major improvement over where I started a few years ago. Guppies dying at 5-6 months. The actual lifespan of the species is about 2 years. Article goes into why fancy guppies die so young. Same situation probably applies to Bettas and other "highly bred" fish that don't seem to last long.

Article has new insights into an old subject.
 

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I have read on the internet that some guppy breeders breed in salty water to reduce diseases and increase yields. Which is great for high volume breeding. But when we purchase these guppies, they have to adapt to fresh water and their immune systems might not be so strong either. This might also explain why some guppies die so extraordinary fast. Which of cause necessitate purchasing guppies again. I am not sure if things like antibiotics or other disease reducing strategies are also in use? All resulting in weak guppies.
 

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On the subject of colony breeding, here's an example of a male who would have lost out under a "free-for-all" mating setup. This Red Grass male was subordinate in a tank with 4 males and ~7 females. Because he just rested on the bottom for months, I thought he was either sick or lazy. But after I pulled out the other males (to test their fertility), he behaved normally and started courting females. To make sure I get progeny from him, I put him with a virgin female for 24 hours. After 3 days--allowing time for him to replenish his sperm--, I'll put him with another virgin. Colony breeding is fine if all the males are from the same strain and equally good, but in my situation with assorted males, planned matings help rescue precious genes from superior individuals. Otherwise, a guppy colony gets skewed over time towards the most aggressive males, not necessarily the most fit or the most beautiful males like this pretty Red Grass.
 

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