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NO3, double what you are using, I add 1/4 teaspoon/20 gal tank every other day or so for this weed at high light(5.5w/gal).

It does better and grows easier at less light, like most plants. There's more wiggle room with less light. Then you can add less NO3 etc.

If you are having trouble with some of these plants, try more KNO3.

The plants will take it from the water column.
I found this plants to fun but a bit too invasive/fast growing for what I want at the moment but has it's uses certainly. Easy to grow but at high light, it likes good NO3 levels, same can be said for a few other plants.

You folks with all that light might want to add 1.5-2x more KNO3. I think you will find along with weekly 50% water changes that the plants will do quite well that you are having trouble with.

Try it for 2-3 weeks and see for yourself. Instead of adding 1/4 teaspoon 2x a week etc, add it every other day.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

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How sure are you that NO3 are not the issue?
How sure are you that CO2 is not the issue?
How sure are you that these are constant?

If a plant is growing along fine, then suddenly you stunt it, some species do not recover quickly, some do, some are tolerant.

I think many folks go through a peroid where the levels of CO2 or NO3 dip too low and then the plants need recovery time.
Meanwhile algae will sometimes creep in.

Even if the other plants appear fine, one plant species may find if difficult to start up again.

Plants are fairly tolerant of PO4 limitation. Same can be said for traces and K+.

Ca/Mg somewhat, NO3 and CO2 cause much more impact.
You can always do large water changes and dose with KNO3 to make certain the NO3 is what you think it is and then double check the CO2.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

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I add it every other day like the KNO3. About .5-.8ppm each time I dose.
Doesn't really matter, the tank is not limited.
Large 50-70% water changes reduce things back down.

As long as I don't limit things, I have no issues. The tank is light limited I would suppose or another way of looking at it: "max light use efficiency"

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

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I use a small spoon from the lab that hits about this range, you might want to measure out some method of dosing it dry if you want more accuracy or add some to DI water and dose the liquid that way.

I don't have a need to be that accurate really any more with PO4. I've done enough with PO4 over the last few years. It's not as critical if allowed to get too low or gets fairly high as many other nutrients.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

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Carlos,
I'm glad you tried upping the NO3. Keep with it for about 3 weeks and then see what you think.

I'm not 100% certain it's NO3 but it might be the K+ also + NO3.

If you like the lower NO3 colors, you can drop the NO3 down for a couple of day etc and get the "red in" take the photo, show your buddies etc then go back to faster growth.

You can also try limiting the PO4 more so that it slows down the NO3 uptake some and make it easier to maintain a lower level at higher light without bottoming out.
To this same effect, one can do this with less light as well.

This can allow good reds with easier wiggle room with NO3/NH4(fish sources at lower light have a larger % on the total N used by plants).

But I think running at higher NO3 for SOME plants might be needed.
Stunting has always been associated with bottoming out the NO3.
Some plants are more sensitive to it and instead of dying/melting etc, they just stunt and wait till the conditions are better and then start growing again.

Some plants seem to need more NO3 than others, wheat for example prefers NO3, not NH4. Sionme aquatic plants like Crypts can handle very low NO3 while Mic umbrosum may need 5-10x as much to grow well.

But few plants seem stunted by too many nutrients.
Perhpas that was what the whole high K+/Ca thing was all about it.

CO2 and NO3 are the two big players.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

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Carlos,
I had a huge weedy patch of Rotala green. Crap took over fast and has a well developped root system. If i kept up on pruning it did very well.

I left for a couple of weeks and did not fertilize, it stunted and took awhile to come back.

I think once the plant stunts, it takes a long time to recover.
Ammannia and other plants will sometimes show this.

But they did recover. Why does this occur?
The plants seem to try to outpace the water when submerged in water with growth as long as nutrients are there.
Once the nutrients run out, they just sit inactive. They do not die, but are likely waiting for the water levels to drop.

Getting them started again takes time.
I had the plant grow back some and get started again.

But.......getting new fresh growing stems would solve the issue and if you keep on the nutrient routine.

Some plants do seem better in softer water but I keep finding myself growing the plants well in harder water later on or find someone that has.

Some tanks even with all the nutrients and CO2/light etc, still need some time to balance out and get going. This takes about 3-4 weeks for me.
Some plants respond slower. This is one of them.

Less light and thereby less reliance on CO2/nutrients also helps with many species even in very hard water.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

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Tropica uses this chelator(DTPA) also.

I grew it at 6KH/9GH.

As long as you keep it growing well and prune it, it will go to town.
Don't let it get overshadowed either.

Somethings it just does not like.

I think it's one of those plants like Mic umbrosum but slower to respond.
M umbrosum you can find along pool edges and growing/creeping into the water some. Both are low NO3 sensitive. The Mic will bounce back quick, not the Rotala.

I purposely stunted the Green Rotala a few months back and then started to coax it back. I was not happy but it did come back after a couple of weeks of coddling.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

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Def one of my favorite pairings.

As far as Mic and Rotala, one plant can bounce back and grow very fast. The Rotala seems to stunt and not recover like the Mic which is great for that.


Some plants are more sensitive to lower levels of NO3, some can handle it well.

The same can be said for when the nutrient drop too low for recovery.
Some plants just switch off and I have not tried it eyt, but I bet if the water level was dropped the plants would flower or start growing again.

These are more palusible difference in growth than allelopathic chemicals which to date have not been shown to occur in natural systems.

These are areas we should talk about and compare.
Figure the plant out well.

It is a weed if you let it run and I like it's smoothering growth a lot.
It's a nice plant for the gardener.

Reghards,
Tom Barr
 
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