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I have an extra 10 gallon aquarium that is just sitting around. I know, it's a sin. But I have repented and decided to use it to grow some Anubias emersed. I would like it to be attractive, not just a farm. However, I don't know much about growing emersed Anubias. I have grown lots of Anubias submerged in my 29 gallon tank - always attached to driftwood.

In a terrarium type of setup, how would my Anubias be best "anchored?" I'm wondering if I can wrap the roots in sphagnum moss and tuck that into an impression in the soil? Would it be okay to use gravel or rocks to cover the visible sphagnum moss?

I'm sure other people have done what I am trying to do, but I have only seen Anubias grown emersed in more of a farm setting. Any advice would be appreciated.
 

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I'd just tie them up to a lump of black lava rock and drop them into place or pile them up. Eventually, they'll grow out enough to hide the gaps and you should have a nice 3Dish setup that way.
 

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This thing is in a greenhouse of the botanical garden of Goettingen, a lava stone with A. barteri var. nana, Xmas moss (Vesicularia montagnei) and a little Bolbitis heudelotii, 2 years ago. The stone lies in a plastic flower-pot saucer with water and is frequently watered from above.

First I smeared wet garden soil on the stone, then I fixed the plants with wire that was later removed. Now the anubias has almost overgrown the stone and moss. The anubias roots are grown downwards into the water and build a mass clinging to the saucer.
The Anubias varieties of the barteri group are rheophytes, growing in tropical Africa on rocks in and on streams and waterfalls - I think, they would look beautiful on a little artificial water course or fall, together with ferns and mosses.
 

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Hello TS,
thank You; it is humid indeed, and I guess the conditions in an Anubias terrarium would be similar. This old greenhouse in the bot. garden is the "Araceae house" and contains a large collection of tropical rainforest plants. On the board beside the Anubias stone are e.g. Cryptocoryne and Lagenandra species, growing in moist but well-drained soil (no stagnant wetness), the pots have a hole in the bottom and don't stand in water:
 
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