Aquatic Plant Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to buy some plants off the trading post here. My question is: is shipping in cold weather fine for most plants? I am in Iowa, and it is rather cold now. How is this taken into consideration for shipping/receiving plants by mail. Any info for this noob question would be appreciated. Thanks!

-Chad
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,540 Posts
I think your answer depends on several factors. I just sent about 8 boxes out the beginning of this week. All arrived in great shape, albeit one was said to be a little dry. One went to New York from TX. I try to ship so that they do not sit anywhere over Sunday. I also take them to the PO so they aren't in a cold mail truck. Things to consider....

1. Is is below freezing?

2. What plants are bring shipped? Some are more fragile than others.

3. How long will they be in transit? If they are very near you then you may get them overnight or in a day or 2. That's usually ok if they are packed/insulated well.

4. Are the plants packed well? Are they insulated from the cold? Are they sent with a heatpack?

5. Are you dealing with a credible seller that will refund or replace plants if they don't arrive in good shape?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,116 Posts
No matter how well you pack the box the plants may die anyway. Of course the seller must do everything to pack them well.

The utimate thing that a seller can do is to guarantee the shipment fully. That means that in case the plants don't make it you get back the money you paid for the plants AND the shipping charges.

--Nikolay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am just looking for a good carpet plant. I am thinking micro swords right now. I think they are pretty hardy, so it sounds like they should have a decent chance. It does get to below freezing here, but I am thinking if I find a good seller who knows what they are doing, things should be fine. Thanks for the input guys.

-Chad
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
I am from Iowa also! :) IMO if you ship or receive a package from somewhere warmer, the plants should be Ok as long as they don't sit in a mailbox all day. For example, I don't see much problems shipping/receiving to/from Florida since the package will spend less time in cold transit than it would if you shipped to North Dakota. I have shipped some packages in the last few weeks without heat packs and things have been fine. This does not mean that they will be fine every time though. You have to just consider how cold it will actually get. If its just a few degrees below zero things should be fine, but if its 8 degrees, like it will be tonight, I would be more worried...Hope this helps even if this explanation is crap;)

BTW...I have some HM Hmianthus micranthemoides I could sell. It is a fast growing foreground/midground plant. In good light it will spread horizontally, especially if kept pruned low. PM if you are interested
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
i have shipped hundreds of times.. and the only issues were when the plant package was allowed to sit outside for hours and froze. Even so, only some plants would be affected.
I just shipped a large assortment to S. Dakota this week, and the day-time temps were below freezing. In the truck, during final delivery is warmer than outside... and with lots of other packages, the in-truck temps doesnt change everytime the door is open . For security for this large SD shipment (which i usually dont even do), i used a fish styro. This is what the recepient wanted, and certainly doesnt allow the temps to drop quickly even if left for an hour on the porch . For smaller shipment, i use a take-out styrofoam container within a plastic bag.
Winter shipping is actually much safer than summer. Some plants can even withstand frost or even freezing, much the same as terrestrial species. I had been keeping some plants outside in a tub and they completely froze (Echindodorus and Vallisneria). After they defrosted they were perfectly fine. That is because these are temperate species. I couldnt say the same for some tropical ones.

Heat is another story. So summer shipping can be trickier. Once they are cooked they are goners. That is why i would be hesitant to use a heat pack. I would be concerned that the box actually gets too hot. Not the same with fish in bags of water. ... then heat packs are a necessity.
When you open a package of plants and they smell like cooked vegetables (thats what overheated aquatic plants smell like), you might as well put them immediately in the trash or on the compost pile. If they get cooked, then stay too long and/or rot in the bag, they need to go down the toilet.
--Neil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
I am just looking for a good carpet plant. I am thinking micro swords right now. I think they are pretty hardy, so it sounds like they should have a decent chance. It does get to below freezing here, but I am thinking if I find a good seller who knows what they are doing, things should be fine. Thanks for the input guys.

-Chad
If the box is well insulated it should be fine coming from a warmer climate. If possible I prefer to have a heat pack worth it in my book for the extra $1-2. Where are you at. I'm in CR, Matt is in Ames.

Craig
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
What I do when shipping in cold or warm waether is I send everything in boxes that I insulate. I buy 1/2 foam housing insulation and cut it to size to fit he box. I purchase a 4'x8' sheet for around $9 then cut it as needed. It is a great way and chep way to help plants arrive in the best condition possible. Being from Nebraska I know how cold can affect the shipments. But like others have said, the biggest problem with plants is when they sit in a mailbox or on a porch for a long period of time. Whether hot or cold, that is the biggest problem shipping plants. I always ask a seller to PM me when they send the item so I can make sure someone will bring in the package as soon as it arrives. I have never had a shipping/receiving problem on this site. People take great care to make sure you get the best quality plants you paid for. Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sweet. Then I should have no worries because all of my packages are dropped off indoors, given that the seller packs appropriately. Thanks.

Chad
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,877 Posts
Doesn't the colder weather preserve the plants? And i thought that the heat is more dangerous for them.
Heat is dangerous because the plants can literally cook if it's too hot. But cold can be just as dangerous if the box is left out in freezing temps and the plants freeze/die. As mentioned before, some plants are more tolerant of extreme temps, but many will not survive at one extreme or the other.

-Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,332 Posts
I used to ship in cold weather months quite frequently. About 90% of the time, everything was fine. That other 10% drove me crazy though. I'm most active on the buy & sell lists in the spring and fall for that very reason.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top