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Short back story, i had RCS and Yellow Shrimp in 2 separate tanks, I dosed Calcium Hydroxide, All my shrimp Died. I made the mistake of thinking some of the Saltwater needs Carried over to Freshwater Big mistake.

Ok So now i have more RCS on the way. I was wondering is their anything i should Avoid doing this time, Other than Dosing calcium i learned that lesson quickly.

Are Any Ferts safe to dose with them? Only plants that will be in the tank Are Moss and Maybe Riccia if i can get some reasonable so i may not need to dose ferts anyway.The tank has 1 6500k 20watt bulb over 10g.

Basically i dont want the same thing repeating itself, another tank of dead shrimp. I did a HUGE (90%) water change on that tank to remove the excess Calcium i dosed.

I need the Do's and Dont's list. I have researched online and as always conflicting info Galore.
 

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Most ferts should be safe, but moss and riccia don't really need ferts. You can still dose ferts that contain copper, but just don't overdose it.

Plus don't keep Yellow Shrimp and RCS in the same thank. They'll "interbreed", resulting in hybrids.
 

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Most ferts should be safe, but moss and riccia don't really need ferts. You can still dose ferts that contain copper, but just don't overdose it.

Plus don't keep Yellow Shrimp and RCS in the same thank. They'll "interbreed", resulting in hybrids.
Oh no they were in 2 separate tanks, i Dosed both tanks with Calcium and lost both tanks.I am beginning to wonder if maybe the calcium had nothing to do with it and maybe i was my Declorinator didn't remove Clorhmines
 

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You'll get a lot of different answers about ferts in planted shrimp tanks, usually depending upon whether someone is really "into" plants (and sees the shrimp as just a pretty add-on), or whether they are really "into" shrimp (and see the plants as merely a decorative backdrop).

One thing I think everyone will agree on is that dwarf shrimp, in general, are much more sensitive to water conditions than your standard tropical fish. That's true of ammonia and nitrite; it's true of nitrate; it's true of most other chemicals as well. And it's especially true of metals, at the top of the list being copper.

I come from the "into shrimp" side of things, so I lean heavily towards the school of thought that one ought not to dose anything at all in a shrimp tank if that is possible; and if dosing something like ferts is absolutely positively required, then be very careful and dose in smaller amounts than you otherwise would. I myself refuse to dose any fert or to put in the tank any food that has copper (in any form) listed as an ingredient.

As for your particular situation, it does sound like you shocked them. While most freshwater shrimp can tolerate somewhat of a range of hardness, it is becoming more accepted among hardcore shrimp breeders that what they can't tolerate is rapid swings in hardness; indeed there is some speculation that they are more sensitive to swings in hardness than they are to swings in pH. Again, we can't know for sure what happened, but your own experience with dosing Calcium would seem to be another data point that supports this theory.

Oh, and btw, I would highly recommend you use Seachem's Prime as a dechlorinator. Not only will it take care of both chlorine and chloramine, it will also bind (detoxify) low levels of heavy metals--including copper--that might occur in your tap water.
 
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