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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a relatively new 20 gallon aquarium that I set up June 15, 2011 and for the first time I noticed a snail that I have never seen before. It is the only snail that I have seen in my aquarium.
It looks like a fairly common snail, and I have attached a photo of it so can you tell me what kind of snail it is?

Also, I do not want my tank snail infested - so do you think I should remove this snail - or just let the single snail live in the tank? I have not seen any holes in any of my plants.

If the snail multiplies then what could I do to remove multiple snails?

All feedback would be appreciated - or referrals to any good articles I could read.
 

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It is a pond snail, genus Physa. They don't harm plants and feed on relatively soft algae and on bacterial films.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you HeyPK.

I am so thankful you answered my post.

Do these snails multiply excessively, and will I start to see many of them in my aquarium?

Should I remove it when I see it again?

Is there any place that I can find information about these snails and if they are positive or negative in an aquarium?

Please reply.
 

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Pond snail populations in a tank will be directly proportional to the food available to them; the more food, the more they breed. Very little food = very few snails. Too much uneaten food laying around = explosion of the snail population. In that sense, having some snails in your tank is actually a pretty good barometer of conditions. If you find your tank suddenly overrun with snails, it means either:

A. you are overfeeding and there is uneaten food in your tank
B. you are not removing dead/dying/decaying live plants from your tank
C. your lighting conditions are such that you are growing a lot of soft algae in your tank

Or some combination of those three things.

If you find there are too many snails for your liking, then (besides addressing the root cause from the list above), the easiest way to remove them is to blanch a slice of cucumber or zucchini (soften it a bit but don't make it mushy), lay it down on your substrate with the lights off (and no light in the room), wait about an hour or two, and then take a look. It will probably be covered in snails. Then simply remove the slice with the snails on it. Nice & easy. If you really have a LOT of snails, do this every evening for several days in a row. You won't necessarily get every single snail this way, but it is a great way to drastically reduce the population quickly and without using any chemicals.
 
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