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One of my favorite grass-type plants is Cyperus helferi, a beautiful green, moderately slow grower, and non-invasive for the most part. I have tried to grow it several times, in different tanks under different conditions. It is an algae magnet in my hands. :( Subsequently, I've quit trying to grow it.

I have various Crypts, and Anubias, also slow growers, yet except for some gsa on old Anubias leaves, these do not get algae. So, imo, growth rate is not the determining factor in whether a plant gets/attracts algae or not. What other factors might be involved in this? Though I cannot prove it, my guess would lean towards the fact that I'm not giving C. helferi optimum conditions. The Crypts and Anubias I have, while slow, may have conditions better suited to their liking. Any other ideas?

Allelopathy, to my knowledge, has not been shown to occur in our tanks, so I don't believe this to be a reason. The old wives tale that you can't grow vals and sags in the same tank is bunk, I've done it many times.

Anyone have any comments/thoughts on this? What other plants do you find to be your 'algae magnets'?
 

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I think a factor is that cyperus is a slow grower as well. Mine tends to get green spot as well. Same for anubias. I notice that my anubias golden, collects about twice as much GSA then my anubias nana. Any chance color of the plant plays a factor?

Back to the cyperus, I have noticed the leaves that tend to grow algae are brown at the base of the plant. When I have uprooted for a replant the leave at the outer most part of the plant are brown at the bottom and those tend to have the algae on them. Also the oldest leaves. Perhaps the leaves have a short life and die for the base to the tip. They stop photosynthesizing and grow algae
 
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