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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand in principle how a solenoid works and I know that when current is applied causes the actuator to open, but why do some designs run hot and some do not?

For those designs that run hot why is there no attempt to try and dissipate the heat - like with a heatsink. I have built several PCs (and OC'd them) - CPU, chipsets, memory all have heatsinks/heatpipes because heat = component failure.

For example, the scanning surface temperature of ADA solenoid reveals that is runs a toasty 40-45C when on, but OTOH the Clippard solenoid runs about 75-92C! The hot spot is just 8C below the boiling point of water!:flame: Probably not a fire hazard unless you keep organic solvents near the solenoid.
 

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Good question I would like to know that one myself. I have a clippard solenoid and it got so hot you almost couldn't touch it. I no longer use it because I run my co2 24 hours a day.
 

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Mine is a Parker 120V 150PSI rated one - it's very warm to the touch - probably around 60°C. I may stick an old PC CPU heat sink on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Maybe it depends on what pressures they are rated to handle?

In my ADA system 74 order is a follows cartridge>>ADA needle valve assembly>>tubing>>EL valve solenoid>>tubing>>diffuser

But on my GLA Primo, I think its CO2 tank>>regulator>>Clippard solenoid>>needle valve>>tubing>>diffuser

If this is correct, then the ADA solenoid "sees" a lower pressure than the Primo. Correct me if I am wrong Orlando.

I decided to attach some spare heatsinks (meant for RAM in graphic cards) to my Clippard with thermal tape. I have a heavy copper northbridge heatsink that I could have used as well but that would require a permanent thermal adhesive compound.
 
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