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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi there

I just bought a driftwood and I have no idea what to do or how to set it up; so i need some advice.

Do i use normal tap water to rinse it first before putting into the tank?

Do I need to buy some moss or some plant to attach to the driftwood? or will moss grow on it overtime itself? if so, which type is best?

what else do i need to know?

thanks in advance!!
 

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I too just got some driftwood. I just filled up a trash can with tap water and let it soak for about 4-6 weeks. I kept it out back because it started to stink (releasing tannins) I dont know what kind you have some have to be soaked longer than others. About the plants on the wood. You will have to tie moss or anubias to the wood it will not just grow on it. Hope this helps.

JAX
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
if I have some plants that have long roots... i think those are rhizoid plants; can I attach those to my driftwood? Will they grow there? And can I use strings to tie them to the driftwood for a while to stable them to the wood?
 

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string, fishing line, rubber bands, hair-ties, plastic-coated wire-ties, shoe laces...well, maybe not shoe laces...

Plants that will attach are mosses, anubias, java fern, other epiphytes. If you're not sure what you have, post a pic and someone can tell you. Or, check out the PlantFinder on this website. (It's at the upper left of the page in a gold colored menu bar.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Driftwood plant

Can I attach this plant to the driftwood? will it grow on there or does it have to be buried into gravel to grow.

Is this a rhizoid plant? On the left, there are 2 leaves growing out from a single leaf tip.
 

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Yes, that is a java fern.

Boiling your driftwood for a while will also kill any nasty hitchikers which may be attached to the wood as well as speed up the sinking process and the removal of tannins. Also make sure you scrape off any portions of the wood which might be mushy, as they will just rot in your tank.
 

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You can definatly speed up the soaking process by soaking it in boiling water for a couple of hours. When the water cools just replenish with new water. Just make sure that before you place it in your tanks to brush it off with a soft brush and soak it for a little while in a high dose of declorinator. I did not have to soak mine for weeks. It really also depends on the wood. Bog roots dont have to be soaked as long and they usally sink to the bottom. I have my wood in a tetra tank so a small amount of tanins is not going to hurt.
 

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I've been soaking some Mopani wood for about three weeks and boiled it over this past weekend. It is still leaching quite a bit of tannin.

That's a good idea about soaking the wood in dechlorinator. I imagine the wood is saturated with chlorine at this point.
 

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Well technicaly speeking the chlorine breaks down fairly quickly in water. So for long periods of soaking you wouldnt have a prob. If you are going to soak it in fresh water then you would want to add some dechlorinator before you put it in your tank.

I personally dont mind a little leaching, keeps it real for my tetra tank. Does not discolor my tank, so I guess its not leaching too much.
 
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