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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if any of you guys know more about this algae. I'm having a hard time fighting it. I did some reasearch online and I didn't come up with much. Let me know what you guys think and whats the best way to fight this. Thanks in advance.

James' Planted Tank said:
Description

Fine strands of green algae sometimes very long in length. Slimy to the touch. Under a microscope the chloroplasts are aligned in a spiral - hence the name.

Cause

Often appears a couple of weeks after a disturbance that causes a spike in ammonia. This can be anything from a disturbance of the substrate to a dead fish gone unnoticed. Likes high light levels and high nutrient levels.

Removal

Once it has appeared it can be very hard to clear as it thrives in the same conditions as plants. Pick out as much as possible and do a three day blackout with CO2 turned off and doing large daily water changes. Dose back with macros after the water change. Afterwards I found normal dosing Excel also helped. Rosy barbs will eat it if made hungry. Also try reducing the lighting.

Another method to try is to try lean dosing at around 1/4 to 1/8 Estimative Index levels for a few weeks. I had good success doing this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hrm no replys. Anyone have experience with this algae? Any kind of help or imput would help. Thanks in advance.

So far heres what Ive done.
-Reduced light from 8 hours to 7 hours
-3 day 50% water changes
-No dosing ferts
-Daily removal of Algae

I'll be trimming my higher plants the next time I do a WC.
 

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I have had whole bunch of it at some point and got rid of it almost completely.
I know it's not "sporty" and first you have to find a reason that causes that (In my case I have had it in the new tank). I have tried to remove it but it grows faster than I could clean it I have found that big water change slows down it grows.
Than I use the following steps:
1) Copper-based algaecide ( I used Archea-brand but you can find some other). Most of the algaecides in the US are not copper based. You also have to be VERY careful with invertebrates - cooper are dangerous for them.
2) Cherry barbs

In 4 days all algae was gone and I have seen some little patches but I think barbs cleaned it really fast.

Good luck!
 

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Hrm no replies. Anyone have experience with this algae? Any kind of help or input would help. Thanks in advance.

So far here's what Ive done.
-Reduced light from 8 hours to 7 hours
-3 day 50% water changes
-No dosing ferts
-Daily removal of Algae

I'll be trimming my higher plants the next time I do a WC.
To give you the best answers, we need to know more information about your tank...

What size is your tank and how much light do you have over it?

What type of light do you have?

Are you adding CO2?

In my experience, water changes don't usually do much for reducing or eliminating most types of algae so save the water. It may temporarily reduce green water and other types that are in the water column itself but it really doesn't do much for filamentous (hair, thread, staghorn, etc) types of algae unless it is free floating in the tank at the time of the water change.

Maintaining good conditions for plant growth is usually the best defense against algae. When plant growth slows or stops (due to low CO2 or fertilizer levels) algae usually starts growing. Discontinuing fertilizers is probably one of the worst things you can do, plant health wise. Granted, algae use the fertilizers just like the plants do but you need to keep the plants healthy.

Fish and shrimp don't always eat the algae faster than it grows and some types of fish simply refuse to eat algae if you feed them fish food. Hydrogen peroxide and Excel overdosing work too but fish, shrimp and some species of plants are sensitive to these methods. IF you want a "quick fix" for the problem and don't mind it coming back again, you can try peroxide or Excel.

Manual removal is the best way to get rid of algae though it is the most labor intensive...the most effective method isn't always the easiest ;) Get in the tank with a toothbrush and remove as much algae as you can. You should do this daily and twice a day if needed to curb the algae growth. Add fertilizers to the tank again (by the way, how are you fertilizing and with what)? Soon the plants will begin to have healthy new growth and should outgrow the algae. This is the point at which you can remove the lower portions of your stem plants and replant the algae free tops.

Again, these are some general recommendations...until we know more about your tank, we really can't give you any more specific help for your situation ;)
 

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To give you the best answers, we need to know more information about your tank...

Again, these are some general recommendations...until we know more about your tank, we really can't give you any more specific help for your situation ;)
Yeah - those recommendations are TOO general. As was said - this type of algae grows in the same conditions as plants so most of the recommendations doesn't work.
Also Excel doesn't work at all against it. I have tried everything non-destructive and found copper-based algaecide the only thing really working.
 

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Yeah - those recommendations are TOO general. As was said - this type of algae grows in the same conditions as plants so most of the recommendations doesn't work.
Yep, pretty much every type of algae grows in the same conditions as plants...that is what makes them so difficult to remove. I have yet to find an algae (other than BBA) that manual removal and proper CO2 and fertilizers will not remedy. You may have to manually remove the algae more than once a day but it will work if you are persistent.
 

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First, do you have Spirogyra or Cladophora?

Under magnification Spirogyra looks like a spiral. IME, the common form tends to have minimal branching and is slick. It responds well to glutaraldehyde and H2O2.

Clado tends to smell funky and is usually heavily branched. It will look like it has dark dots rather than a spiral. It will feel more like say, wool than silk. Its also a bitch to get rid of. Prolonged dosing of 2-3 ml/gallon of 2.5% glutaraldehyde. Like, 2 weeks of dosing. Kiss goodbye to Vallisneria.
 
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