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I have an Anubias Nana that has grown quite large (and has flowered 2 or 3 times) attached to some driftwood in my tank. How do I go about safely splitting? the plant so that I can have more? I am not that familiar with Rhiozome divisions.

Thanks
 

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Don't worry about it. Just cut the rhizome into however many seperate plants you want, it will grow back. Trusted method.
 

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Beginner

At least with rhizome division. First, what does the rhizome look like. Second, do I leave leaves and roots attached to each split.
 

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The rhizome is the thick green 'root' lets say that leaves come out from and roots on the underside. It should be real easy to find and when you do cut it wherever you want.

Andrew
 

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Is it difficult to separate an anubias that is growing attached to wood? I'm worried about damaging the roots.
 

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Anubias are extremely hardy. I wouldn't worry too much about damaging the roots when you separate it from the driftwood. I have split Anubias many times, and for me at least, part of the process means pruning the roots, especially in a long established plant. I have had roots that have been about 6 inches long. I cut them down to about 1 -1.5 inches and replant. When you plant them, make sure the rhizome isn't buried because that will kill the plant.
 

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Didn't wanna start a new thread on this.

I have an anubias nana that I want to split. I've had it wedged into a crack in a piece of driftwood and it's started growing out from it, consequently the rhizome is very long (2 or 3 inches). Obviously, the part of the rhizome that was wedged in the crack has no leaves growing from it. If I cut this part and attach it to wood it will regrow leaves right?

Seems a stupid question, I'm fairly sure it will but want to be certain before I go chopping the little fella up!
 

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Thanks, I'll let you know how it goes.

I think I read somewhere that you can make little nicks with a blade in the rhizome to promote leaf sprouting. Anyone ever tried it? How deep do you cut?
 

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Hello guys,

According to my previous experiences you can cut the rhisome anywhere you like and only take care that you leave at least one or two leaves on it. Dont worry about damaging the roots or rhizome as it will recover very quick. If you damage the rhisome, in app. 2 weeks time you will see that it is recovered and will also produce a forked rhisome exactly from that part. For example you can have more than 10 anubias from a 10 inches healty anubias. I have hundreds of Anubias leaves in my tank now. Pay attention not to bury the rhisome completely if you are placing it in the substrat. On wood or rock there is no problem, if you get excessive roots cut them without hesitation. Don't worry. If you want smaller leaves put the plant in a well shaded place, this way I have many small leaves which is smaller than half inch. Above ideas may seem so wild for some of you, but it works great for me. Anubias would be my number one plant only if it hadn't been infected by GSA so easily.

YILDIRIM
 

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If you damage the rhisome, in app. 2 weeks time you will see that it is recovered and will also produce a forked rhisome exactly from that part. For example you can have more than 10 anubias from a 10 inches healty anubias.
Hi, could you explain this a little more please?
 

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Hi pseud,

If you damage the rhisome, in app. 2 weeks time you will see that it is recovered and will also produce a forked rhisome exactly from that part. For example you can have more than 10 anubias from a 10 inches healty anubias.

The two sentences are not related to each other, its my error it seems so.

At first sentence what I meant was something that I discovered accidentaly. I was cutting out an old yellowish leaf with a blade as close as possible to the rhisome, because if some part of the stem of the leaf stays with the rhisome it will decompose quickly with an ugly sight. But during the cutting blade slipped some and made a crack on the rhisome about 1cm in length and app 3-4mm deep. I got mad at myself for this accident but there was nothing to do and I left it in that way. I watched carefully everyday what my clumsiness will result but in a week time I saw that the crack is getting brownish but smaller everyday. In two weeks the brownish spot was reduced to the size of a pinhole and I noticed that something green is coming out of it which at first I tought it was a leaf but later it grow and became another rhisome with new leaves on it. At first I tought it was a coincidence and chance. Then I suggested to give a second try. This time I made it on a rhisome which I already considered to cut as it was growing out of the bark it is attached. I made an exactly same sized crack on the rhisome and guess what. Same thing happened and a new rhisome branched from that cut resulting a T shaped rhisome. I liked that very much and considered it as a good way to give any shape and direction I like to the rhisome.

And second sentence was regarding to my regular rhisome splitting practice. As long as the rhisome is healthy, you can cut it from any place you like even as small as it just had 2 leaves and some roots on it. So as an example I said that from a ten inches anubias you can get at least 10 cuttings.

So I can tell that anubias could be the perfect plant only if it didn't grow so slow and easily infected with GSA. It can grow at any condition, it is very hard to damage it and nearly impossible to kill. Flowers nicely.

YILDIRIM
 

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Thanks Yildirim, that's great. I understand completely now. I find that both interesting and practical. I'll have to try it with my anubias. I need about 3 times as many as I have now so with this knowledge I'm sure I'll easily achieve that!
 

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The big deals for Anubias nana IME are: 1) Do not bury the rhizome 2) keep enough potassium and iron available 3) avoid hard green spot and BBA (!) and 4) be patient.

I get faster growth with roots in substrate, do not fear to trim the roots when moving a rhizome, agree that nicking or scarring the rhizome promotes branching, and use the stuff for rather lumpy carpets in multiple tanks (yes, it has taken decades).

Now I just have to stay patient long enough to replace much of it with A.b. nana petite.
 

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Hi,
Does anybody experienced with a potassium permanganate bath for cleaning well stablished GSA on Anubias leaves? how much time you had these plants in it without safety problems for the plant?
 

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Hello Maurici,

If I were you I wouldn't try any chemicals, because most of them als damages the palnt and aslo you can not use them safely in the tank, you have to remove the plant some other container. Anyway what I will tell you is just increase the PO4 levels (mine is around 5ppm according to the tests and I have to say that I donot believe any test kits available for hobbyists) and also the CO2 levels as well. This will prevent GSA to appear again and also you will get rid of the existing GSA on leaves. For a quick result you can also cut the heavily infected leaves. This pruning will also encourage plant to grow much more new leaves.

YILDIRIM
 
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