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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey everyone, I am currently working on setting up a high-tech 20 gallon long with a 10 gallon sump. However, most of what I've been able to find online for sump design/layout is for reef tanks which seem like they won't be quite right (don't really need chambers for refugium/protein skimmers, etc). Most of the freshwater designs I've been able to find seem to be for wet-dry filters which seem like it would lead to even more outgassing of CO2 than a sump already would. So if anyone could point me in the right direction for some info on sump design for planted tanks I would appreciate it!

I was also looking for thoughts on media, right now I'm thinking of stuffing it with sponges and maybe using pumice or similar for additional bio media. I've also thought about just using a bunch of foam of varying densities (like poret) as the only filter media.

Edit: Just realized I posted this in the equipment sub forum instead of filtration as I intended. Sorry for posting in the wrong spot!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hello Everyone,

I've been working on the sump design layout and wanted to gut check my design to make sure I'm not missing anything and that the sump won't flood. Some background on the system: 20 gallon long drilled for eclipse S overflow and return, aqueon 10-gallon aquarium for the sump, undecided return pump but likely the Jebao DCP-2500. I've included a sketch below (excuse the rough sketch).

View attachment 2223250

As for the design, I'm thinking a 3 baffle design should maximize my media space while still being relatively simple.
Chamber 1: Water in and coarse sponge. 5" wide, baffle overall height (including gap at bottom) is 10" with a 1.75" gap at the bottom for water outflow
Chamber 2: Heater chamber. 5" wide, baffle height is 8.25". I wish this chamber could be smaller but this size already has me placing the heater in at an angle
Chamber 3: Fine foam, ceramic bio media, and purigen. The baffle is the same as chamber 1
Chamber 4: Return pump

Flood protection math:
I measured the display tank's inside height at about 11.75 and the height from the bottom of the weir teeth to the top of the tank at 1.4. So dividing 20 gal by 11.75" gives about 1.7 gal per inch in the display tank. Then multiplying 1.7 gal/in by 1.4" gives a power outage drain volume of 2.38 which I rounded to 2.4 gal.

Moving to the sump, the inside height is 11.375". If we divide 11.375" by 10 gallons we get 1.1375 in/gal. Multiply that by 2.4 gives us a water rise of 2.73 inches. Add the water rise to the operating height of the fixed height chamber of 8.25 for a worst-case water height of 10.98" which is a bit tight on the 11.375 height of the sump since the above math doesn't account for water in the overflow box or lines. However, the height of the overflow from the tank top was measured right to the lip at the top, the actual water level will likely be lower. Also, I used the operating height of the fixed level portion of the sump and from my understanding, the right two chambers will have a lower water level which provides an extra safety net.

Does this reasoning and design sound workable?
 
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