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From what I understand the first step in the ADA approach for setting up a new tank is to repair the roots of the plants from the damage caused by replanting. That is exactly what the hormon & vitamin supplement SuperThrive does to terrestrial plants. Fom what I have seen professionally SuperThrive works very very well with terrestrial plants.

I guess SuperThrive must have been discussed before but I was wondering if anyone had conclusive results about it specifically for aquatic plants.

--Nikolay
 

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It works for emersed plant. I am not sure if it is fish safe for submersed plants.

At least this is what I was told by people who used it.

kind of expensive to use for common aquatic plants. I can see it being beneficial for rare plants needing fast recovery.

Speaking of superthrive, I found an article saying that superhtive does not work on most if not all carnivourous plant.
 

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Well, you could always keep a little onhand with a 5gallon or something for reviving those uber-special plants. Course that only matters of its not fish safe;)
 

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I know about a year ago there was an aquatic plant fertilizer on the market with low fish safe doses of plant growth hormones in them. There was also one with plant hormones for compact growth. I know the plant hormones I work with when propagating or controlling the growth of plants (I work in a plant research facility) are not something I would introduce to a tank. First, I know at least one is not fish safe, as the label specifically inhibits disposal of chemical as waste water, or into waterways. Another thing is some can be toxic to us, or some contain fungicides or other pesticides, and this is the LAST thin I would want in my tank. I say wait and give them optimum growing conditions. In my personal experience, pushing plant growth with hormones makes for spindly and weaker growth long term, and also stresses the plant making it less disease and pest resistant (this is in regards to terrestrial plants). Just a word of caution, so if you do want to try it (and I encourage experimentation) use your cheap/extra plants and a small non-fish aquarium.
 
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