Aquatic Plant Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After I read the San Marcos biotope, I am really excited to know that we Texans also got many fascinating aquatic plants:)

In two weeks, I will go camping with few friends in the Inks State Park. They have this really nice all-year round lake that is affected little by the drought. So the water level there is always fairly constant.

My question is, if anyone has had any experience collecting aquatic plants in Texas, what kind of plants will/shall I expect to find in that area? I have really little knowledge of aquatic plants but I will do my best.

Speaking of which, I guess I will go take a look at those pictures in the San Marcos Biotope topic again to get the images stuck in my forgetful head:p


Paul

BTW, did yall go to the outlet? hahaha:p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
Paul,

Generally, bring back samples of anything that is in water. Sometimes a dry area will fill with water and the plants will grow in a boggy environment, but most of these plants I have found don't take well to 100% submerged life. The same with ditches around here. People are afraid of Nile virus so there is usually little standing water in the ditches. However, take samples anyway. From my limited experience in the San Marcos area plants like Saggitaria, Ludwigia, Hygrophila, and Echinodorus like shallow water. I have the best results when the water has a brown muddy tinge to it. We have seen Hydrocotyle, Cabomba, Potamogeton, Zosterella in slightly deeper water.

If you are going to be out a few days, bag your plants with just a little water and put them in a big cooler.

Where is Ink Lake? It seems like an exciting trip. Do you have any decent nets? (See my fish article: http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forum/cms_view_article.php?aid=7). There's a lot of good aquarium fish in Texas too!

Regards,
Steve Pituch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Many thanks, Steve! Here is the link to Inks SP.

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/park/inks/inks.htm#directions

According to the website, it is a very scenic park with a lake that has a consistent water level year-round. I have two nets that are used for fishing; one long and one short. I don't have dip nets, though. What would you recommend? I am gonna go check out your website again;)
All in all, just bring back plants that are in water, right? Gotcha! Oh yeah, btw, do you know if there is any law regarding collection of wild specimens?
Thanks so much!

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
Paul,

I suggest you study this page carefully.
http://www.ntwgs.org/articles/illegalAquatics.html#the list

If a plant is prohibited, you could receive a whopping fine. If it is invasive or non-indigenous it is stilll OK to take samples. If it is endangered it would also be a problem. Right now the only endangered plant I know of in TX is the Texas Wild Rice at the source of the San Marcos River.

There is also a Federal prohibited list but I don't know if thats just for transporting across state lines.
----------------------------------------------------------
To net any type of fish you need only a Texas fishing license.
------------------------------------------------------------
There are some enagered and even possibly recently extinct fish in TX. You can check at the park office or their web site.
--------------------------------------------------------------
I can't remember this exactly, and can't find the documentation, but a few years ago I did some research on State Park's range of authorty. I think that they have complete jurisdiction of a body of water if it is less than 50 acres and totally enclosed by the park boundaries. If the Inks State Park is only on a small part of the shore of the lake, you should be able to take samples of the Flora in the water of the large lake. But I think that many Park Rangers are over protective, and will prohibit everything if you ask them, even though it is incorrect. You don't want to get into an argument with one of them.
---------------------------------------------
If you have a canoe, you should be able to go to parts of the lake out of the boundaries of the park. In fact, you will probably be more productive if you look for streams and marshes adjacent to the lake. You won't find plants in a deep lake.

Steve Pituch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Much help appreciated, Steve:) Yeah, I read the article and the list. I will keep everything you said in mind! Actually, I'm rather excited about doing some plant collecting; as long as they are legal, mind you;) The cooler idea is excellent. Would you think it is better if I bag the plants individually in plastic bags and then put them altogether in the cooler? Or would you just dump everything into the cooler directly? Thanks so much!



Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
I think they do better if you stuff them in 1 gallon zip lock bags as you pull them out of the water. In a boat things can get very confusing and crowded. Put a little water in each bag and throw them in the cooler. People will think the cooler is for a picnic or for game fish. These were our plants the day after our expedition:
http://users.ev1.net/~spituch/Steve's Page/Aquarium/Expedition 1/Expedition 1_25.html

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the helpful tips, Steve! Man, everything looked so professional in the picture! I will be sure to do the same when I go. Hope there ARE aquatic plants there;)



Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks, I will do my best:) I'm also into turtles so it will be exciting to see what kind I can find. I only catch them and then release them back. I never keep them so if there are any turtle hard core ppl out there, don't hate, hehe:) I am more into learning what species we have here in Texas.


Yeah, I better start memorizing those native Texas aquatic plants cus I have terrible memories:)



Paul
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top