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Trying to help a friend scape a challenging tank. It is a roughtly 7ft x2ft x2.5ft high tank. This is currently a SW tank but he is strongly entertaining the idea of converting it to a planted. The size isn't as much of a challange as the inconveniance of access. The tank sits about 3ft off the floor making the top of the tank right above your head! . So pretty much, access is very limited. Even with a ladder, there isn't a lot of room to work with. obviously very long "tongs" will be needed. This pretty much lends itself to a super low maintenece setup...something that only needs to be hacked at every 6+ months. letting the tank go wild is fine as long as "it is still beautiful" ;)


Does anyone have any suggestions of recommendations? the guy is really into SE Asia if that helps (he often goes there on collecting trips).
 

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Pay attention to the growth patterns of different types of plants and it becomes possible to let the plants scape themselves. Easier said than done but initial planning goes a long way.

Low maintenance plants like Java ferns is what I'll grow and lots of driftwood laid out nicely. It fills the design and don't need as much hacking as live plants.

Substrate fertilisation for long term root care. Poking fert sticks into a such a big tank is tedious...

Have lots of Shrimps, SAE, Otos and other algae cleaners so you don't have to remove them with your hands very often.

Planning, planning, planning!
 

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Tony,

I would go Crypts, Anubias, Moss, and Fern. That's about as simple and low maintenance as you can get. It should also be good for long term aquascape potential. Hell, if the guy goes to SE Asia often tell him he HAS TO bring back some crypts and use them. If not I'll be flying to CA for a whooping.

Best,
Phil
 

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Personally, I would go with Marsilea quadriflolia as a foreground... or perhaps the white sand.

A tank like this would look fantastic with some large, well placed pieces of driftwood --perhaps covered in moss, Bolbitis heudelotii, and Anubias barteri v nana.

Anubias gracilis makes a beautiful, slow growing plant with large leaves --the Senskes have swords that are way too big for even their massive tanks!

Of course, any Anubias, Crypt, fern, or moss would be an excellent choice.

Carlos
 

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Hi. This a great example, take a look at Amano at his best:

Go to: http://www.takashiamano.kit.net/step/more/MoreMontages.htm
and click on the + sign where it says Montagem 5 and then on each of the following links there:
Colocando Troncos (Placing logs)
Rochas (Rocks)
Substrato & Rochas (Substrate & Rocks)
Plantando (Planting)
Visão Geral (General View)
Frontal (Front)
Idealizador & Obra (Planner and Work)
Detalhe (Detail)
Regards.

P.S.- Isn't that amazing?

Hmm... was this off-topic? :roll:
 

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Well, I just cleaned my 6 ft tank last night and one more time I learned the same lesson:

Big tanks are much more manageable for maintenance if the plants that are used are not fine leaved and don't have fine roots.

I think if one looks at Jeff Senske's tanks he/she will notice that over the years his 'scapes have been simplified - using more big leaved plants in those monster size tanks.

I tend to disagree with Tsunami about he Marsilea. Yes, fine leaved plants will create the illusion of the tank being bigger but the maintenance, especially of Marsilea will be a pain.

My choice would be swords, Java Fern, Anubias and wood and rocks that create an impression of something big and massive. Actually I'm about to try do something similar with the now clean 6 ft. tank - using Hygro salicifolia, Hygro siamensis, Hygro difformis, and dwarf sags arranged about 1-1/2 cu. ft. of wood.

--Nikolay
 
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