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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Marimo Moss Balls are one of the most exciting plant discoveries in recent years.
Marimo is both strange and lovely, because of its simple maintenance. They are commonly kept as beautiful plants in jars in Japan, and enhance water quality by producing oxygen and eliminating nitrates. Also known as Cladophora ball, moss ball, or lake ball, is a rare growth form of Aegagropila linnaei.

The action of the waves leads the algae in these lakes to gradually develop into spheres of soft, green algae with a fuzzy, velvet-like feel as they mature. The bulk of our Marimo Moss Balls is 1.75 to 2.25 inches in diameter, implying that they are 8 to 15 years old. We occasionally get Marimo with diameters of 3 to 4 inches that are believed to be over 20 years old! They grows very slowly, thus it will take a very long time for them to develop significantly in size.

Liquid Bottle Purple Drinkware Azure
 

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My Marimo Moss Balls keep falling about into little itsy bits of moss.

I have four or 5 of the smaller ones (around 2 inches); but one giant one that they had at petco - somewhere between 3 and 4 inches. I never realized that in my life time they probably won't grow much... unless i live another 100 years.
 

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enhance water quality by producing oxygen and eliminating nitrates
I feel like this is a bit of marketing liberty. Technically, all plants and algae do this, but because marimo "moss" grows so slowly, it's arguably a pretty poor option relative to almost anything else that's available.

They're simple. They're attractive. There's decent demand for them.

You have to rotate them every so often to keep them looking nice.

But, they've become hard to find in some parts of North America in the last few years, as a major supplier was linked to contamination with an invasive species.
 

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I feel like this is a bit of marketing liberty. Technically, all plants and algae do this, but because marimo "moss" grows so slowly, it's arguably a pretty poor option relative to almost anything else that's available.
My thoughts exactly, Japan after all is known to prefer small portable stuff with an aesthetic design
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My Marimo Moss Balls keep falling about into little itsy bits of moss.

I have four or 5 of the smaller ones (around 2 inches); but one giant one that they had at petco - somewhere between 3 and 4 inches. I never realized that in my life time they probably won't grow much... unless i live another 100 years.
Some ways, Marimo works harder than fish. But most of them're easy to care of when they are young.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I feel like this is a bit of marketing liberty. Technically, all plants and algae do this, but because marimo "moss" grows so slowly, it's arguably a pretty poor option relative to almost anything else that's available.

They're simple. They're attractive. There's decent demand for them.

You have to rotate them every so often to keep them looking nice.

But, they've become hard to find in some parts of North America in the last few years, as a major supplier was linked to contamination with an invasive species.
Great point.
 
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