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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello Pyokorin, wellcome to the forum

This yujii is cool!!

Unfortunately, this species are out of my hands...

i use to visit some japaneses crypts site ... this one is my favorite

http://homepage3.nifty.com/crypt2/

Many info... in japanese though... but the images can be useful.

what is the mix soil that you use for this sensitive crypts?

Greetings from Spain
 

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:shock: Pyokorin,

You need to send us a few plantlets of that so that we can have it on this side of the ocean! Please!!!

Pyokorin said:
Next is C. yujii !!
This is collected from Sungai Nibong Sarawak at July 2004.

What's next one?
 

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Xema,

Could you post how you are keeping these plants?

Good work, by the way. That's an interesting undulatas as it is missing the distinct broad collar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Could you post how you are keeping these plants?
Sure Art,
I keep them in a little outdoor set up.... it´s a big foam box, with a transparent cup (policarbonate with doble side). this box has a bottom layer of sand, into under the sand i putted a heating thread (really 2, 2x50w heatings threads). the air temperature into, is about 24ºC and the sand about 26ºC. .. Ahhh, i forgot it... i cover the sand with water, 1 or 2 cm over the sand surface, to keep the enviroment humidity (is around 95%).
The mix soil??? is a good question.... i use several soil mixtures.... but i can say to you that the better can be a mix of inert peat (from sphagnum moss) or coco fiber (coco litter?) with a little beat of clay (akadama, that is a clay used in bonsai culture).... and some inert sand.

Lastly i am starting to think in the importance of the inert soil to grow crypts. I was using a good clay mix (red, akadama, sepiolite clay, and so on) with Organic Matter, and sand..... this fixture is good, but crypts are late to grow rigth. i allway reading in Jan D. Bastmeijer´s page about litter beech tree soil.... that is a very inert and acid soil... he tell us that it is a good soil to grow the most of crypts.... and i think he has the reason about this. Also, i think the type of soil is intimately related with the water level around the pot. So an enrich soil with a higth water lever can be bad for the grown of the plants... in this way some of my crypts are late to get a good size about 8 month. Actually i am testing several new soil fixtures.... but at the moment i cann´t tell us any serious result.... many factor influence in the grown, and for us (hobbiest) is difficult to know what is the real reason to a bad grown.
Another important factor is the water flow around the pot.... that can minimize the bad effect of an enrich soil. Unmature organic matter (without decompose) can be determinant, without water flow.

i wait you can understand me.... (sorry for me bad english)
 

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Xema,

I find substrate important in growing some Crypts. However, I've grown the more common ones just fine in inert mediums such as rockwool (Grodan). The beech leaf mold is VERY acidic and Jan/Niels use it for more demanding species.

I agree that water level and movement is important, particularly when using clay pots. I like to keep the substrate moist by capillary action so I typically keep water at a low level.
 

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Im very sorry.
My English skill is very poor :-s

This time is...
Cry. pallidinervia!!


>Xema
Your site is nice!
Cry.yujii, cordata, griffithii, scurrilis, purpurea and ....
which are said Peat Swamper need low pH.
Most important is low pH(4~6)!
To keep low pH is use low pH soil and pure water(such as R/O water).
Japanese keeper use the Aquasoil(Amano's company) or peat soil.

>Art_Giacosa
Hi!
nice to meet you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Now is time to wendtii....



it is no so amazing like your pallidinervia...

I just buy some sensitive species like coronata, striolata, longicauda and yujii... i put them in a mix of coconut fiber and akada clay (50 % of each)... any advise?
 

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How great your wendtii is !!

I dont know your coconut fiber and akada clay(akadama clay?).
So I cant say good or bad.

But I know what soil these species love.
coronata love sand pH 6.5-7.5, very tough plant.
striolata love sand pH 6.5-7.5, it is slightly delecate.
longicauda and yujii love low pH and peat soil such as pH 4.0-6.0.

I saw your web site.
Very good !
The picture of griffithii from Japanese web site are from
Bintan Island. I took them at 2004.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Hey Pyokorin!!!!

Yours replys allway are very interesting....

do you mean this picture of a griffithii is your?


it´s a very cool specimen...

Thanks for the comments about my web...

coconut fiber is a compost based in the fiber of the fruit of a coconut palm. it seems like blond peat... but it has a higth ph (around 6-7)... doesn´t have many nutrients. the other item is akadama, this used clay in bonsai culture in your contry.

About my wendtii... is not so big.... i changed it to a new soil (coconut fiber) and it flowered at the following weeks.



Greetings from Spain
 

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Xema said:
do you mean this picture of a griffithii is your?
I collected it, but the plants of picture is not mine.

Xema said:
coconut fiber is a compost based in the fiber of the fruit of a coconut palm. it seems like blond peat... but it has a higth ph (around 6-7)... doesn´t have many nutrients. the other item is akadama, this used clay in bonsai culture in your contry.
Aadama has a power to down pH.
I think it is good soil choice, but it is very difficult to say that the crypt will grow good.
Because, crypt is mysterious and delecate plants.

lorba said:
do you have any recomendation for keeping ferruginea? sand or acidic soil like ADA?
Hi lorba!
I had only started to grow ferruginea last March.
And, I bought the ferruginea from your company.
So, I cant say good advice.
Some Japanese mania say that ferruginea from Sarawak easly grow under pH 6.5-7.5.
 

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Coming soon is a C. walkeri variety ( think!) from I can't remember where---some local fish store. I will get a picture when the flower opens.
 

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Pyokorin said:
Hi lorba!
I had only started to grow ferruginea last March.
And, I bought the ferruginea from your company.
So, I cant say good advice.
Some Japanese mania say that ferruginea from Sarawak easly grow under pH 6.5-7.5.
Oh.. nice to see you here! :)

Anyway, I've gpt some emerse ones collected since and grow them in several soil type:

1. Peat moss + compost + some animal ash. It soak in too much water and it didnt grow much. Tend to melt eventually.

2. beech litter + little sand/compost and little animal ash. Seems fine and the new leaves came out after a few days of changing.

After seeing your post, i changed my coronata and striolata to sandy gravel right away. Hope to see better growth. The coronata was a melting baby when i got them, only 30% survived, but they grew strong.

One question to anyone, how does water circulation helps in a emerse set up? When the crypts are potted and the holes are underneath the pot? I know that crypts grow better and bigger in the water in the fast current area.
 

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C. walkeri

I am fairly sure this is C. walkeri. On Jan Bastmeijer's walkeri page there are yellow and green flowers, and one brown flower. All of them have in common that the collar is lighter than the limb. Mine looks very much like the brown one. The plants were emerse in a gallon sized glass pickle jar with a rather narrow opening. I had hoped to be able to pull the plant out with a long pair of tweezers, but all I succeeded in doing was to rip off the flower. The plants in this jar bloomed last year at this time (2 flowers), and this year I am getting at least three.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yeah, the color of the limb and the collar look like walkerii, but i never saw a twisted limp in walkerii... mines not blooming yet...
 

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The C. walkeri plants that produced the flower have plain green leaves when grown emersed, but when submersed, they have beautiful, long, dark green leaves with red streaks. This is an honest-to-goodness red color, and quite spectacular. I have another walkeri that has very similar leaves, except that the streaks in the submersed leaves are brown. I wonder if the red plants lack a pigment that the brown plants make, sort of like red ramshorn snails and brown ramshorn snails.
 
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