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Discussion Starter #1
Hope you have seen the movie with Hugh Grant, else my joke is lost on you :lol:

Anyways! Lately I have been using gravel to make hills and dimensions to my aquscape, instead of just the normal sloping towards to back approach. This look good, and works great... for about a day or so. Then it just flatens out and the dynamics I was looking for is lost. What to you do to make it last a atleast a few weeks? I have been thinking about letting some glosso grow, then sprinkel it with gravel, let i grow, sprinkel again and so forth until I got the shape that I'm looking fore, but this is a SLOW approach. Is there any other advice I should try out?
 

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Keeping Gravel In Place

Mate I had the same problem as you in regards to my gravel settling level. The thing that I tried that worked, other than terracing was to put down a decent sized rock or series of rocks on the bottom of the tank (on top of a layer of foam to save the tank) and then lay the gravel over the top. I suppose that it is still a form of terracing however the gravel seems to stay in place pretty well, seems to bind in with the rock surface a lot better than it does with just plain gravel. With only a little bit of settling and topping up initially. The other thing that this method does is save you gravel/substrate in order to do another tank, as I'm planning to do. I'm sure however that there is some simpler ways of doing this.
Cheers,
Bryce.
 

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Hanzo,

Controlling erosion. Just like on land but a bigger problem because its always raining in the tank.

I wish I could help you but I think terracing is the only answer. Sorry. I was very into it about five years ago. If you find rock that you love it can be very nice. I cut my rock to fit better with a ceramic tile saw I bought when I was redoing the bathroom. I silconed them to ceramic tiles for bases. I had some very vertical rocks also, see first picture on:
http://users.ev1.net/~spituch/Steve's Page/Aquarium/hardware/hardware.html
Good luck and let us see the results.

Regards,
Steve Pituch
 

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Some of the tanks in the AGA contest have mounds that are not terraced --how they held them up:

1) make the mound about 50% larger than you want it to be

2) encourage growth out of your plants as fast as possible so the roots of the plants can hold it in place. Hairgrass, glosso, stargrass, and Hemianthus micranthemoides should be good plants for holding up mounds. Bad plants would be the kind that you have to uproot, top, and replant.

Carlos
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the good advice! I must admite that I never heard about terracing, so I'm not sure what that means, anybody are to share a few lines about it?
 

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Using rocks to make terraced retaining walls to hold back the substrate. They can be very steep and show a lot of stone as in one large almost vertical wall, or very gradual with only thin strips of stone showing. In the latter the gravel could cover most of the stone but the horizontal strips can be used as a design element. You can use silicone to stick the rocks together so they don't fall down. To help fit the rocks tightly against each other you be trim them with a ceramic tile diamond blade water cooled saw. These are currently about $75 in the USA.

For the vertical rocks in my previous picture I cut the bottom end off of a long pointy rock and then glued it with silicone to a broad ceramic tile to give it support.

The way Amano lays out some of his rockscapes I would imagine he trims a lot of the rock since they interlock so well and appear to be a big rock.

Steve Pituch
 

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I think it was Ricky cain who had the mound. It looked weird he kept it so well. Hairgrass is what he has on it but i think once anything carpets things will hold together well. Also try and keep current out of the hill. I dont see how standing water will cause any erosion on gravel other than just gravity.
 
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