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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if anyone has any comments as to why my tiger lotus leaves turn green and brown less than a week after emerging. I fertilize by substrate only with tabs. Lights are 330watts over a 125gal that are on for 9 hours a day with C02 injection. pH is 6.8.
I've provided a picture to better indicate what I'm talking about.

Any help would be appreciated...
 

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I will attempt to answer this, please for give me if I am incorrect. From what I under stand the red pigment in plants is from the chlorophyll turning color to reject too much light. So under moderate to low light conditions the plant turns green because there is no need reflect any light. Maybe some one with a little more ecology under their belt will chime in a explain this a little better.
 

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I sort of agree with what chagovatoloco is saying if I may add a twist. My understanding is that green light is not usable to plants, it is only the most visable light to humans. The pigment will change in plants from receiving improper light spectrum. The deal with red plants is that they come typically from deeper waters where green light is reduced and more blue light is what penetrates. The reason green plants are green is because the chlorophyll absorbs red and blue spectrum light and reflects green spectrum. {The green portion of the color spectrum is so abundant in nature where they grow, they would probably wither and fry from too much of it, (only my hypothesis)} so again, they reflect green and that's how we see them as green. A red plant being for deeper water with less green spectrum doesn't need to reflect green light as much as it's green leafy buddies. Red plants absorb blue light and reflect red light.
So even though you have a good watt per gallon ratio, you might be giving too much light in the green spectrum.
I myself have a Tiger lotus along with many other red plants and it is as red as a beet and I use less powerful wattage with a nice full color spectrum. What type of lighting are you using?
That's not to say that is your problem. How long have you had the tiger lotus and has it always done this. Sometimes it could just be that particular plant itself doesn't carry a heavy red pigment.
 

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I have 96 watts of 6700K over my 10 gallon, and I have a red tiger lotus that does the same thing. It will have red leaves until they reach the water surface and then they turn green in a few hours time from reaching the surface. Thanks for explaining this.
 

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I sort of agree with what chagovatoloco is saying if I may add a twist. My understanding is that green light is not usable to plants, it is only the most visable light to humans. The pigment will change in plants from receiving improper light spectrum. The deal with red plants is that they come typically from deeper waters where green light is reduced and more blue light is what penetrates. The reason green plants are green is because the chlorophyll absorbs red and blue spectrum light and reflects green spectrum. {The green portion of the color spectrum is so abundant in nature where they grow, they would probably wither and fry from too much of it, (only my hypothesis)} so again, they reflect green and that's how we see them as green. A red plant being for deeper water with less green spectrum doesn't need to reflect green light as much as it's green leafy buddies. Red plants absorb blue light and reflect red light.
So even though you have a good watt per gallon ratio, you might be giving too much light in the green spectrum.
I myself have a Tiger lotus along with many other red plants and it is as red as a beet and I use less powerful wattage with a nice full color spectrum. What type of lighting are you using?
That's not to say that is your problem. How long have you had the tiger lotus and has it always done this. Sometimes it could just be that particular plant itself doesn't carry a heavy red pigment.
Sounds like you kind of sorted out what I was trying to say, thank you. It seems like the spectrum may be the problem.
 

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I fertilize by substrate only with tabs. Lights are 330watts over a 125gal that are on for 9 hours a day with C02 injection.
The theory by other sounds good, but is only a theory. (Not saying I know anything)

This is what concerns me, fert tabs only with high lighting. It may be the cause, but also just another theory. Maybe too low N?

I just received some red tiger lotus, it was not really that red when I got it, mostly green w/ red specs. The only new leaf that is growing is brownish color. I have Lower lighting(~2wpg of ODNO T8's). Also I had low nitrates b/c I have no fish and did not dose enough to start(which also accounts for my algae issues at this time, again I'm new at this stuff but love to learn)
 

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I have two tiger lotus. One in a tank with medium light with two t5's 6700 and 10,000. The leaves are quite red and grows lower and floating leaves. The other one is in a tank with low light, but a 6000 cf. The leaves are mostly green and floating. They shade the anubia's which grow quite well. I really think the spectrum of the bulbs makes a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all for your input...I'm thinking the depth issue to be part of the reason for the red on the leaves. I'm going to switch all the lights to 9325k and see how the plant responds. I'll keep everyone posted..

BTW- the leaves are now staying red for at least a week or more and are getting to be the size of a small dinner plate...Just an amazing looking plant..
I'll post a picture tomorrow..

Regards......Jeff
 

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changing the color temp of the bulbs will not help. Tiger lotus comes in both red and green types, sure yours is a red one?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
By increasing the Co2 and fertilizing more often, I'm finding the leaves are staying red much longer than previously. I've noticed that the more light there is, the more the leaves congregate closer to the bottom rather than spring further up. Here is a updated pic.
 

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Many plants just have very different leaves depending on whether they are grown emersed or submerged, including water lilies! It's not about the color spectrum of your lighting; or about your fertilization routine.
 
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