Aquatic Plant Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For half a year, I kept buying Tiger shrimps and they just kept dying 2-6 each night. I don’t know what is wrong with my water, I have fire red and they are all fine. Check PH around 7, No Ammonia or nitrite, tds 120-280. TDS used to be 120, I added some Japanese macrobiotics stuff and it raised TDS quite substantially. I have to oxygen pump working to make sure there is no lack of exygen happening. Please Anyone has experience with normal Tiger shrimp give me any suggestions? Really really appreciated.
Plant Grass Terrestrial plant Terrestrial animal Wood
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Tiger shrimp - a cross between CRS and Taiwan Bee? That's what I understand them to be.
Water specs for mine are -
pH around 6.3 - 6.5 (no higher than 6.5)
kH 0-1
gH 4-6 (I use Epsom salts - PURE Magnesium sulfate to raise this)
TDS 150ish
Temp 22 degrees C
Zero ammonia, chlorines, nitrate and nitrite

I have yellow cherries (neocaridina) in the same water and they do fine also. If I buy new ones it's only a baby one or so that might die.
Hope you figure it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
gH 4-6 (I use Epsom salts - PURE Magnesium sulfate to raise this)
Shrimp need calcium and magnesium in the water for proper molting. You can use a mix of calcium sulfate and magnesium sulfate to do this. However you KH is also zero. So you have no buffering of the PH. Calcium and Magensium sulfate will slowly reduce the PH in a planted tank. I think you would be better off using calcium gluconate and magnesium gluconate. gluconate is a type of sugare that is safe in an aquarium. Bacteria will gradually consume the Gluconate converting the calcium and magneisum to carbonates. Calcium and magnesium carbonates will push the PH to no more than 7and keep it there. This would resolve you pH, Kh, and GH issues.

You can use fertilizer nutrient calculator like this one to determine how much calcium and magnesium gluconate to add. Generally you want to aim for 3 parts calcium and one part magneisum. mix.

Do not use sodium bicarbonate or potassium bicarbonate to adjust KH. Doing so would result in water threat is mostly potassium or mostly sodium. Too much sodium or potassium can kill animals and fish and humans. K and Na bicarbonates also can push the PH above 7. In any aquarium you want roughly equal levels of sodium and potassium for healthy fish and shrimp and plants. Typically tap water has sodium but based on your water parameters you are probably using distilled or RO water.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top