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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I think I have reached a stage in the hobby, where I am able to grow a healthy planted tank with more or less all plants that I have got my hands. All of them are exotic plants while some of them ranging from moderate to quite difficult plants to grow.

I want to further study about the various trimming techniques to have the desired effects for a nature aquarium style layout. Techniques to trim, background Stem plants to give a layered look - Rotala Sp. Didplus Diandra, Pearl Grass, Ludwigea Repens, Alternanthera Reinikii, Ammania, Mints ETC, , Midground plants like Hygrophila Carimbosa compact etc, the fore ground plants like Marsilea Hirsuta, Glosso, HC, Dwarf Hair grass.

Can any one please help me with this. I will be grateful to him or her for the knowledge.

Sincerely,
 

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I can give it a quick stab but I'm not really an aquascaping guru.

Most stem plants respond very, very nicely to scissors. Most people will let new plants grow almost to the surface and then cut them about 1/2 way or 2/3 of the way down to the substrate. The healthy tops can be replanted if desired to increase the thickness of the planting. This cycle can be repeated probably three or four times. The technique does eventually produce leggy, ugly bottom portions. Usually, midground plants are positioned to cover up the unsightly portions of the tall stemmies behind.

Certain very large and other delicate stem plants are best uprooted and topped. This leaves the healthy tops in a good viewing position.

One of the best stemmies to get experience with IMO is Bacopa caroliniana. You can try several different techniques with this plant. If you cut off the main portion of the plant, a large number of side shoots will quickly form below the cut portion. In two or three weeks these healthy smaller shoots will grow above the cut line and will fill in the available area quite nicely. On the other hand, you can trim away any side shoots that form and aim instead for a robust, full central stem. When they get too tall you can uproot and replant the tops. The final effect is quite different. The first method produces a large number of visually attractive small shoots and the second method produces individual bold, colorful large stems.

If I get a minute later I'll go over some other midground and foreground options.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey Bryce, Thanks for the know-how..it sure is helpful to me..Look forward to your extra minute eagerly :)
 
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