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My 3 koi platies have got a twisted body now for the last 2 weeks. I keep them in a sulwesi tank with a PH of 8.5. I used 4 of them to cycle the tank and 3 were fine for about 2 months. One died after a month but was not deformed and now another one just died. The 15 sulawesi shrimp in there are all fine. My ammonia levels are 0 as well. Any ideas what could be the cause?
 

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Seems very weird. I have seen twisted bodies on babies from nutrient deficiency but never developing later in life. Sometimes a deficiency in calcium can cause the bones to deform. I don't know how well platies do in water that is that high in pH. I know that in reptiles the Ca deficiency causes there bodies to curve.
 

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The calcium deficiency I mean is ingested. Are they eating well or have they stoppped eating?

I don't know if the higher pH is giving the fish a hard time keeping it's blood calcium balanced. I don't know just throwing out ideas.

Could it also be a disease of these fish where you got them or genetic?

Hope this helps.

I found this on internet:

Hi Cathryn. a bent spine can come from vitamin C deficiency or injury. You should mix up the fishes' diets with deferent kinds a foods and flakes. Also, electrical shock can cause this. The source probably a faulty heater or pump. You should check to make sure that this is not the case. If your fish is older it could just naturally be getting a bent spine. its actually pretty common among fish like guppies/platies to get bent spines when they're older. because your fish is still eating, infection or disease or ruled out. If there is anything else, let me know! ^_^

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Fish Tuberculosis (Mycobacterium)
S: Fish may lose color and appetite and become hollow-bellied. Fish become lifeless and often crippled–with a bent spine. Fish develop ulcers under the skin and may rupture causing open sores and “pop-eye.”
A: This disease is highly infectious and deleterious. Bacteria can remain living in the gravel to infect other fish when they are weakened. Some success has been achieved by treating infected fish with antibiotics (Oxytetracycline and Kanamycin), although often it is best to kill the fish and put it out of its misery. When removing piscine tuberculosis victims, do so with care, as this disease can be transmitted to humans.
 
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