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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Jeff Senske has sent us a few more photos, this time of a 75g stem plant arrangement:











Plant species are:

Rotala rotundifolia (green), Rotala macranda narrow-leaf ("magenta"), Rotala wallichii, Hygrophila polysperma, Hygrophila difformis, Hygrophila sp. "compacta" (Tropica hybrid), Eusteralis stellata, Eusteralis sp. "giant",
Ludwigia "Cuba", Ludwigia ovalis, Limnophilia aromatcoides, Myriophyllum
mattogrosense, Eleocharis vivipara, Anubias nana, Crypocoryne "willisii",
Java Moss.

For more of his works: www.aquariumdesigngroup.com

For APC's ever growing inspirational gallery:
http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forum/album_cat.php?cat_id=13

Enjoy,

Carlos
 

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Three things:

1) Wonderful scapes!

2) The pictures are downsampled with nearest neighbour algorithm which makes them really pixelated. If APC automatically downsamples uploaded images, please make it use at least bilinear or preferably bicubic downsampling. The downsampled result might be less sharp, but more naturallooking. I have personally solved this by applying sharpness on sites using automatic downsampling, but that might be somewhat over the top.

3) I was wondering if these aquarium use CO2? If I'm not mistaken Aquarium Design Group makes aquascapes that should last long and with minimal maintenance. As I want to setup such an aquarium for a buddys workplace I would like to get some hints and tips.

I was thinking less light, no CO2 and Walstad-substrate and really easy plants (Java fern, Anubias and..?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The problem with the images is now being addressed. I may end up sending the originals to you, Daniel, since I know you're excellent with photoshop.

I don't think it's so much APC's doing moreso than the cheap photoshopping software on the college campus computers.

Carlos
 

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This tank is awesome! I love the jungle look it has...Carlos, is he going to replace those fast growers or is this just an easy-growing tank?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Image problem resolved! Hopefully, Jeff Senske will pitch in and do a little explanation on this tank (he is a member on this board).

Carlos
 

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I'm not sure what Raul means regarding changing the "fast growers"?
I can say that a synnetrical feel was actually intentional on this layout due to client's request . You should see this guys yard- perfect symmetrical balance on both sides of his sidewalk. Everything in his home is very orderly and balanced also. I am really trying to get away from these types of layouts, but I do feel a little implied symmetry can be made to work (though I did try and skew things a bit in order to keep it from looking too hopelessly contrived).
On the Giant E. stellata, I am just guessing at the name as I haven't really heard an exact scientific for it yet. I just know that it's exceedingly beautiful and extremely easy to grow. This layout has come back from no less than 5 major trimmings.
I'm happy to answer any other questions as well.
 

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Jsenske
Very beautifull landscape !!!
Could you give us some more details on your substrate, lights, fertilisation regime are you doing the fertilising or your client is it done throu dosing pumps? By the way how old is this setup?
 

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For me personally that is an interesting tank to look at. The detail pictures showing the symphony of leaf shapes, colors, and hues are amazing. They look like paintings - especially where one can see the E. vivipara (I believe that's the plant). Also the picture of the stems of green rotala stretching over the dark area is very, very elegant.

And yet - I don't like the tank as a whole. I think that for me the foreground is what breaks the wonderful experience. Look at the first picture, cover the foreground right under the Anubias with your fingers and look at the tank... see if you agree with me.

The symmetry... the E. vivipara is positioned dead center - I personally would move it just a little bit off center. I think that a little overall asymmetry would help the tank immensely, but Jeff meant to (had to :) ) create a symetrical composition.

Jeff, I was wondering something - since you place your tanks taking into consideration from where they will be viewed - is this tank usually being looked at from a "full frontal" position, as the owner would probably prefer to?

--Nikolay
 

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To answer Freeman:
The tank is about 1 year old, though it has seen many changes and numerous major trimmings. It has 1- 48inch PC fixture (Coralife) that houses 4- 65watt bulbs (2-10,000K and 2- 6700K) and 48inch VHO flourescent fixture that houses 2- 110watt 10,000K bulbs. Fertilization is done once per week following water changes and includes Seachem iron, NPK, & Seachem EXCEL. The client adds a daily dose of the DuplaPlant 24 as well. The substrate is mostly Carib-Sea ECO-COMPLETE (a product I am no longer using though).
To answer Nikolay:
I totally agree about the foreground. It is predominantly Crypt. willisi because it lasts avery long time and requires very little maintenance. It is purely a "business decision" to do such a foreground and by no means my first choice. However, now that someone has pointed it out, I will likely change it or do a whole new layout in this tank very soon. These types of reasons are why I don't show a lot of my tanks and especially woould not enter them in a contest- there are very often just too many comprimises I have to make to facilitate weekly maintenance and still pay my mortgage.
The E. vivipara in the middle is a bit too centered, I agree. However, it stretches the length of the back of the tank and is at times a lot fuller than in this particular photo. Its presence can really change with different trimmings.
As for the viewing position, yes, the client's perspective is definitely a consideration and this tank is viewed from then front almost exclusively.
 

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How much NPK do you add in ppm? If you dont mind answering. I am wondering because in a tank i have setup i only have 4 days to mess with it. Monday-thursday. So it is hard to get in a full maintnance like i do with tanks in my house.
 

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To answer ShaneSmith:
In terms of the ppm of NPK, honestly I am not sure. I know I am dosing 1ml per 20 gallons on both N and P, and 5ml per 50 gallons on K. I've never been too big on testing water though I know I should. My goal has always been more to try and feel each tank out as I go and adjust accordingly. I don't think this approach is for everyone, though.
 

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Are these brand name fertilizers or ones you make?

I never test eithere. I like to follow the estimative index for the most part.
 

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Awesome tank. You're too modest sometimes, Jeff. :D

I don't think it comes off as symetrical as you feel. I wish I could get my E. stellata to grow as good as you and Luis. Must be that hard water down there.

I have seen the "giant" eustralis refered to many times as Pogostegmon stellata or Potomageton stellata. I can't remember which one and I have a feeling neither of them is the plant's true scientific name either. Ghazanfar has an amazing pic of this plant somewhere. I can't find it at the moment though.

I have a 75 and all these species in it... hhhmmmmm... why doesn't it look this good? It's more of a farm for me I guess, but makes me think of the possibilities.

Ben
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The proper name for Eusteralis stellata is Pogostemon stellatus. Recently, a new variety of this plant has been introduced called Pogostemon stellatus 'Broad Leaf' which is much more easy to grow.

Both of these plants are in the Plant Finder with full descriptions and lots of pretty photos.

Carlos
 
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