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In my case I just bought some cheap potting soil from a nursery after confirming that there are no added ferts in it.Let it dry in the sun for 4 days.Layed it on the bottom for 2",covered it with sand for 2".I put a plate on the bottom,slowly filled it with water for 10",planted the plants & filled it completely with water.For the next 2-3 days I kept on adding plants.
Hi all. Just joined. Am currently (Nov. 25) apprx. where Ravi was in August: i.e. beginning :rolleyes:
This is a perfect forum and thread for me, 'cause it is current. There have been so many I've read over the past month that are dated 2003, 2005, LOL. And then on top of that, this thread is frequented by The Woman Herself :cheer2:

I bet that I am going to get my number one question answered. And my question may indicate a hang-up of sorts, I can see how that might be. Anyhoo...

My question has to do with planting. And please keep in mind, will y'all?, that I am an ornamental horticulturist and botanist - completely terrestrial! So a little knowledge...is....dangerous :D Using the 'hi-tech' approach obviates my question. Using low-tech generates it.

How does one plant the plants in the low tech approach without getting the soil substrate all stirred up?

Parenthetically: I did see Betty's Hex tank demo. She planted her plants with the substrate barely wetted (and this may help with not stirring up soil). This is OK, as far as I can see, when the plants are rosette-types and/or those that can grow emersed, and hence, have some stiffness to their foliage. But with the stem types, and obligate submersed types, it seems to me that it would be awkward and challenging to plant them without the water to buoy them.

My image is that plants should be planted by making some sort of small depression, space, hole, whatever you want to call it, so as to be able to spread out the roots somewhat before pulling the substrates back over them. Doing it this way I can't see how I am not going to stir up the soil and get cloudiness, etc. Not to mention unintentionally mixing the top gravel layer with the soil layer.

Does all this make sense? I won't even get into the other stuff I am wondering about. Or begin to commune publically with Ravi (he is already in my mind my brother-in-spirit! we have a tendency to do things the same: research first! plants first then fish LOL :cool:).
 

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Walstad-Method Tank: WATER CONDITIONER?

Thank you Ravi! I do see what you are telling me. Also, by the way, I read over the process of "mineralizing" soil and intuitively I resonated with that. It just makes sense. For instance, re: the question of the newly submerged soil "chaos" - mineralizing the soil gets that submerged process going beforehand, as far as I can tell.

I have a very straightforward question for Diana. So I hope she is tuned in. In your book, in the section VIII on Substrate, page 138, you wrote:

"I usually let the tank run overnight with the heater, lights and filter hooked up. The next day I'll add a water conditioner and the fish...".

I looked everywhere in the rest of the book to find out what you mean by a "water conditioner" and couldn't find any other reference to same! So, what is it? :confused:
 
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