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Zapins: I did not want to walk on anyones Thread but from what I am given to understand water holds about 2 1/2 times as much Nitrogen gas at cold temps as at tank temps. The tiny bubbles we often see in a tank that cover everything is Nitrogen gas trying to escape the water. I have been warned that this can cause the Bends and literally lift the Slime Coat off of a fish.

Some extras that you can check out in School.

A lot of folk assume that CO2 is odorless but I have found by being around a lot of Dry Ice that it can really bite your nose if it gets too concentrated.

The common chemicals such as Salt, Oxygen, and Gasoline are extremly beneficial but can if misused be extremly dangerous. It is true that CO2 can be hazardous too.

I believe that the amount of CO2 in water is not all that variable unless we mess with it.

I saw that someone was making the assumption that just because Chlorine did not want to stay in water and came out rather quickly that all chemicals were the same. As, I am sure you know, this is not so.

Just a little food for thought and a caution.
 

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Zapins: I did not want to walk on anyones Thread but from what I am given to understand water holds about 2 1/2 times as much Nitrogen gas at cold temps as at tank temps. The tiny bubbles we often see in a tank that cover everything is Nitrogen gas trying to escape the water. I have been warned that this can cause the Bends and literally lift the Slime Coat off of a fish.
Interesting. I had always heard it was CO2 - especially if your source of water is ground water, but I have been skeptical for a number of reasons stated in the other thread, nitrogen gas might make sense, but I'd like to read some sources about how it becomes more concentrated in the water than other gasses. The bends are not really a concern though in the aquarium. I doubt the fish would suffer nitrogen problems from a water change. There would have to be some pretty extreme conditions and circumstances for that to happen other than a simple water change.

A lot of folk assume that CO2 is odorless but I have found by being around a lot of Dry Ice that it can really bite your nose if it gets too concentrated.
Also, what you are "smelling" is not the CO2 itself, but rather, feeling the CO2 turn into carbonic acid in the mucus lining of your nose (it reacts with the water in the mucus), then the mild acid irritates the nerves which is what you feel.

Thanks for taking the time to post this thread!
 
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